Osborne Writing Center  

The Basics I Writing Scholar Program I Young Writers & Artists Festival | Speaker Series I 
Online & Print Publications I Peer Writing Partners

November 8-10, 2018

TESTIMONIALS

     What people say about the Osborne Writing Center

Osborne Writing Center: The Basics

The William McKinley and Jessie M. Osborne Writing Center has a central goal: to help girls find their voices. The Writing Center serves the entire high school population and helps students with any piece of writing at any stage of the writing process ─ from brainstorming topics to final revisions. 

Students can meet with the director about papers for any course or subject, and are encouraged to work with him on their creative writing as well. Students may meet with the director during any free period by either making an appointment or dropping in to the Center.

The director works closely with students interested in creative writing, serving as a mentor and editor and helping students to submit their work to publications and contests. Last year alone, Hathaway Brown students working with the Writing Center won four national medals and twenty-one regional medals in the Scholastic Art and Writing Contest. Hathaway Brown's creative writers have also earned the Certificate for Superior Writing from NCTE, been published in national print journals, and collaborated to produce the "Why I Write" Traveling Stanza.

Learn more about the Writing Center here.


Writing Scholar Program

This three-year course of study brings you into collaboration with visiting writers from across the country, nurtures your creative sensibilities, and helps you discover and develop ways to articulate yourself with greater artfulness and confidence. Students also take leadership of the school’s community of writers. Seniors may choose from several capstone courses: Creative Writing, AP English Literature and Composition, and Contemporary World Literature.


To receive the Osborne Writing Fellow designation, students must successfully:

  • Take at least two years of writing electives, including at least one year of The Writing Community
  • Complete either AP Lit, Honors Creative Writing, or Honors World Lit as a capstone course
  • Participate at least two years in the Young Writers and Artists Festival
     

Young Writers And Artists Festival

Take part in a daylong immersive workshop led by an eminent and engaging professional writer or artist in the form that most interests you: Poetry, Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Slam Poetry, Graphic Storytelling, Painting, Photography and more. The 2018 Upper School Young Writers and Artists Festival will be held November 8-10. The festival is open to Northeast Ohio students in grades 9-12. Learn more and register here.


Online & Print Publications 

The Writing Center also is the production hub of Retrospect, HB’s online student newspaper and literary magazine. Visit the online paper here. Take part in a vibrant student forum and help shape the school’s identity in print. 


Peer Writing Partners

Upper school students share their expertise, offering one-on-one conferences in the middle school writing center and leading group creative writing workshops. This program also pairs freshmen writers with juniors and seniors, who mentor them along in the craft.


Visiting Writer Speakers Series

You Never Know Who You Might Run Into! 

We’ve welcomed a number of best-selling and award-winning novelists, screenwriters, historians, journalists, and poets to campus in recent years to share their work and their wisdom with us. New programs and speaker events are being added to the calendar every day. Stop by Room C249 to see the Writing Center for yourself.

2018 Visiting Writers

 

September 28, 2018 


 

Danez Smith and Hieu Minh Nguyen

Danez Smith is a Black, queer, poz writer & performer from St. Paul, MN. They are the author of [insert] boy (YesYes Books, 2014), winner of the Kate Tufts Discovery Award and the Lambda Literary Award for Gay Poetry. Selected as a 2017 National Book Award finalist, Danez recently released their 2nd full collection, Don't Call Us Dead, published by Graywolf Press in September of 2017. Danez is the recipient of fellowships from the Poetry Foundation, the McKnight Foundation, and is a 2017 National Endowment for the Arts Fellow. Their work has been featured widely on platforms such as The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, Buzzfeed, the New Yorker & the New York Times.

Hieu Minh Nguyen is the author of This Way to the Sugar (Write Bloody Press, 2014) which was a finalist for both a Minnesota Book Awards and a Lambda Literary Awards. His next collection Not Here, is forthcoming from Coffee House Press in April of 2018. A queer Vietnamese American poet, Hieu is a Kundiman fellow and a poetry editor for Muzzle Magazine. His work has also appeared in the Southern Indiana Review, Guernica, Ninth Letter, Devil's Lake, Bat City Review, the Paris-American, and elsewhere. Hieu is a nationally touring poet, performer, and teaching artist. He lives in Minneapolis where he flails his arms and forgets to take his clothes out of the dryer. 

October 22, 2018

 

 

Dan Fesperman

Dan Fesperman's travels as a writer have taken him to 30 countries and three war zones, beginning with the Persian Gulf War in 1991. But it was his introductory trip to the besieged city of Sarajevo in January 1994 that inspired his first novel, Lie in the Dark. In the ensuing years he has drawn on the exotica and intrigue of similarly far flung locales for setting, character and plot.

He grew up in North Carolina, where he was educated in the public schools of Charlotte before graduating from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Anyone wondering about the university's influence, particularly with regard to basketball, need only consult page 67 of The Small Boat of Great Sorrows (p. 79 in the UK edition).

As a journalist he worked at the Fayetteville (N.C.) Times, Durham Morning Herald, Charlotte News, Miami Herald, and The Sun and Evening Sun of Baltimore, contributing heartily to the eventual insolvency of two of those newspapers. But it was the Sun which catered most grandly to his wanderlust. Baltimore editors dispatched him to cover the Gulf War from Jordan, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait; then sent him to Berlin to run the paper's Europe bureau during the years of the Yugoslav civil wars in Croatia and Bosnia; and in 2001 assigned him to cover events in Pakistan and Afghanistan in the wake of 9-11. Along the way he also reported from throughout the rest of Europe and the Middle East.

November 8, 2018

 

Sarah Kay, Hanif Abdurraqib, Jamaal May

Sarah Kay grew up in New York City and began performing her poetry when she was only 14 years old. Even though she was often the youngest poet by a decade, Sarah made herself at home at the Bowery Poetry Club, one of New York's most famous Spoken Word venues. In 2006, she joined the Bowery Poetry Club's Poetry Slam Team, NYC Urbana, and competed in the 2006 National Poetry Slam in Austin, Texas. She has also performed internationally in the Czech Republic, the United Kingdom, India, South Africa, the United Arab Emirates, France, Spain, Sweden, Australia, Mexico, and Singapore. Jamaal May was born in 1982 in Detroit, MI where he taught poetry in public schools and worked as a freelance audio engineer. His first book is Hum (Alice James Books), which received the American Library Association’s Notable Book Award, Foreword Review’s Book of the Year Silver Medal, and an NAACP Image Award nomination. In 2014 Jamaal received more than a dozen awards and honors including the Spirit of Detroit Award, the Robert Frost Fellowship to Bread Loaf Writers Conference, The J. Howard and Barbara M. J. Wood Prize from Poetry, and a Civitella Ranieri Fellowship in Italy. Hanif Abdurraqib is a poet, essayist, and cultural critic from Columbus, Ohio. His poetry has been published in Muzzle, Vinyl, PEN American, and various other journals. His essays and music criticism has been published in The FADER, Pitchfork, and The New York Times. He has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize, and his poem "Hestia" won the 2014 Capital University poetry prize.

November 12-14, 2018

 

Alexandra Fuller

Alexandra Fuller has written numerous books, including Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood (Random House 2001), which was a New York Times Notable Book for 2002, the 2002 Booksense Best Non-fiction book, a finalist for the Guardian’s First Book Award, and the winner of the 2002 Winifred Holtby Memorial Prize. Her 2004 Scribbling the Cat: Travels with an African Soldier (Penguin Press) won the Ulysses Prize for Art of Reportage. She also is the author of The Legend of Colton H Bryant (2008 Penguin Press). She contributed the essay about Wyoming that appears in the 2008 book State by State: A Panoramic Portrait of America. Fuller’s book Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness (Penguin 2011), is a prequel/sequel to Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight. Her latest book, a memoir of marriage and divorce, is entitled Leaving Before the Rains Come (January, 2015). Fuller has written extensively for magazines and newspapers, and her work has appeared in The New Yorker, Vogue, and National Geographic.

November 15-16, 2018

 

 

Linda Fairstein 

Linda Fairstein – lawyer, former prosecutor, and author of twenty-three books – is one of America’s foremost legal experts on crimes of violence against women and children. For three decades, from 1972 until 2002, Fairstein served in the office of the New York County District Attorney, where she was chief of the country’s pioneering Sex Crimes Prosecution Unit for twenty-six years. In that position, she supervised the investigation and trial of cases involving sexual assault, domestic violence, child abuse, and homicides arising out of those crimes. Fairstein is the author of nineteen crime novels, published by Dutton, featuring Manhattan prosecutor Alexandra Cooper. The most recent of these – DEADFALL – was published in August, 2017, and like the fifteen which preceded it became an “instant” New York Times bestseller. Many of the books have been translated into more than a dozen languages. The 20th book in the series – BLOOD OATH – will be published in March, 2018.

December 2018

 

 

David Giffels

David Giffels is the author of the memoir, Furnishing Eternity: A Father, a Son, a Coffin, and a Measure of Life, to be published by Scribner in January 2018. His previous books include The Hard Way on Purpose: Essays and Dispatches from the Rust Belt (Scribner 2014), a New York Times Book Review “Editor’s Choice” and nominee for the PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay, and the memoir All the Way Home (William Morrow/HarperCollins 2008), winner of the Ohioana Book Award.

January 2019

HB Alumnae Student Panel

Ronda Kyle '15 (Barnard College), Becca Lambright '15 (University of Pennsylvania), McKenna Ritter '16 (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)

February 20, 2019


Hilton Als

2018 H. William Christ Keynote Speaker, presented in partnership with the Hathaway Brown Parent Association

Hilton Als began contributing to The New Yorker in 1989, writing pieces for ‘The Talk of the Town,’ he became a staff writer in 1994, theatre critic in 2002, and lead theater critic in 2012. Week after week, he brings to the magazine a rigorous, sharp, and lyrical perspective on acting, playwriting, and directing. With his deep knowledge of the history of performance—not only in theatre but in dance, music, and visual art—he shows us how to view a production and how to place its director, its author, and its performers in the ongoing continuum of dramatic art. His reviews are not simply reviews; they are provocative contributions to the discourse on theatre, race, class, sexuality, and identity in America.

Before coming to The New Yorker, Als was a staff writer for the Village Voice and an editor-at-large at Vibe. Als edited the catalogue for the 1994-95 Whitney Museum of American Art exhibition “Black Male: Representations of Masculinity in Contemporary American Art.” His first book, The Women, was published in 1996. His book, White Girls, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in 2014 and winner of the 2014 Lambda Literary Award for Non-fiction, discusses various narratives of race and gender. He is author of the introduction to the Penguin Classics edition of The Early Stories of Truman Capote. He is also guest editor for the 2018 Best American Essays (Mariner Books, October 2, 2018). He also wrote Andy Warhol: The Series, a book containing two previously unpublished television scripts for a series on the life of Andy Warhol. 

In 1997, the New York Association of Black Journalists awarded Als first prize in both Magazine Critique/Review and Magazine Arts and Entertainment. He was awarded a Guggenheim for creative writing in 2000 and the George Jean Nathan Award for Dramatic Criticism for 2002-03. In 2016, he received Lambda Literary’s Trustee Award for Excellence in Literature. And in 2017 Als won the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism. 

Als is an associate professor of writing at Columbia University’s School of the Arts and has taught at Yale University, Wesleyan, and Smith College. He lives in New York City.

March 2019

 


Paula McLain

Paula McLain is the author of the New York Times bestselling novels, The Paris Wife and Circling the Sun. She now introduces her latest title, Love and Ruin.

Paula McLain was born in Fresno, California in 1965. After being abandoned by both parents, she and her two sisters became wards of the California Court System, moving in and out of various foster homes for the next fourteen years. When she aged out of the system, she supported herself by working as a nurses aid in a convalescent hospital, a pizza delivery girl, an auto-plant worker, a cocktail waitress–before discovering she could (and very much wanted to) write. She received her MFA in poetry from the University of Michigan in 1996.

She is the author of The Paris Wife, a New York Times and international bestseller, which has been published in thirty-four languages. The recipient of fellowships from Yaddo, The MacDowell Colony, the Cleveland Arts Prize, the Ohio Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts, she is also the author of two collections of poetry; a memoir, Like Family, Growing up in Other People’s Houses; and a first novel, A Ticket to Ride. She lives with her family in Cleveland.

April 11-12, 2019

 

Hanif Abdurraqib

Hanif Abdurraqib is a poet, essayist, and cultural critic from Columbus, Ohio. His poetry has been published in Muzzle, Vinyl, PEN American, and various other journals. His essays and music criticism has been published in The FADER, Pitchfork, and The New York Times. He has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize, and his poem "Hestia" won the 2014 Capital University poetry prize. His first full length collection, The Crown Ain't Worth Much, is forthcoming in 2016 from Button Poetry / Exploding Pinecone Press. He is a Callaloo Creative Writing Fellow, an interviewer at Union Station Magazine, and a poetry editor at Muzzle Magazine. He also is a member of the poetry collective Echo Hotel with poet/essayist Eve Ewing.



2017 Visiting Writers

Monday, September 18

Anis Mojgani

Anis Mojgani is a two-time National Poetry Slam Champion, winner of the International World Cup Poetry Slam, and multiple-time TEDx Speaker. He has been awarded residencies from the Vermont Studio Center, AIR Serenbe, and the Oregon Literary Arts Writers-In-The-Schools program. Anis has performed at numerous universities, festivals, and venues around the globe and has performed for audiences as varied as the House of Blues and the United Nations. His work has appeared on HBO, NPR, and in the pages of such journals as Rattle, Forklift Ohio, Paper Darts,Thrush, and Bat City Review.

Anis is the author of three poetry collections, all published by Write Bloody Publishing: Songs From Under the River, The Feather Room, Over the Anvil We Stretch. His latest book, The Pocketknife Bible, is a fully illustrated poetry-memoir. Originally from New Orleans, Anis currently lives in Oregon.

Website

Tuesday, September 26

Robert Gaudi

Robert Gaudi is a historian, screen writer and novelist from Virginia.  His new book, AFRICAN KAISER, a history of World War One in Africa, was published in March 2017 by Berkeley Books and generously praised by the Washington Post:  “His sentences are models of clarity and vivacity, sometimes further enlivened with wry authorial comments. Gaudi writes with the flair of a latter-day Macaulay…sets his scenes carefully and describes naval and military action like a novelist.”
In fact, Gaudi, a graduate of the University of Virginia and the University of Iowa’s Writers’ Workshop has published novels and short stories under another name.  He has written teleplays for the network shows Joan of Arcadia and Judging Amy, as well as screenplays.  His work has appeared in Harper’sWashingtonian Magazine, Tri-QuarterlyLandscape Architecture and The Virginia Literary Review among other publications and has been translated into several foreign languages, including Estonian and Hebrew.  The son of a career C.I.A. officer, he spent most of his youth in Europe during the Cold War; he currently resides in Washington D.C. with his three teenage children. 

Website

Thursday, October 26

 

Alexandra Fuller

2017 H. William Christ Keynote Speaker, presented in partnership with the Hathaway Brown Parent Association

Alexandra Fuller has written numerous books, including Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood (Random House 2001), which was a New York Times Notable Book for 2002, the 2002 Booksense Best Non-fiction book, a finalist for the Guardian’s First Book Award, and the winner of the 2002 Winifred Holtby Memorial Prize. Her 2004 Scribbling the Cat: Travels with an African Soldier (Penguin Press) won the Ulysses Prize for Art of Reportage. She also is the author of The Legend of Colton H Bryant (2008 Penguin Press). She contributed the essay about Wyoming that appears in the 2008 book State by State: A Panoramic Portrait of America. Fuller’s book Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness (Penguin 2011), is a prequel/sequel to Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight. Her latest book, a memoir of marriage and divorce, is entitled Leaving Before the Rains Come (January, 2015). Fuller has written extensively for magazines and newspapers, and her work has appeared in The New Yorker, Vogue, and National Geographic.

Website

Thursday, November 2

Naomi Shihab Nye

Naomi Shihab Nye describes herself as a “wandering poet.” She has spent 40 years traveling the country and the world to lead writing workshops and inspiring students of all ages. Nye was born to a Palestinian father and an American mother and grew up in St. Louis, Jerusalem, and San Antonio. Drawing on her Palestinian-American heritage, the cultural diversity of her home in Texas, and her experiences traveling in Asia, Europe, Canada, Mexico, and the Middle East, Nye uses her writing to attest to our shared humanity. Naomi Shihab Nye is the author and/or editor of more than 30 volumes. Her books of poetry include 19 Varieties of Gazelle: Poems of the Middle EastA Maze Me: Poems for Girls, Red Suitcase, Words Under the Words, Fuel, and You & Yours (a best-selling poetry book of 2006). She is also the author of Mint Snowball, Never in a Hurry, I’ll Ask You Three Times, Are you Okay? Tales of Driving and Being Driven (essays); Habibi and Going Going (novels for young readers); Baby Radar and Sitti's Secrets (picture books) and There Is No Long Distance Now (a collection of very short stories). Other works include several prize-winning poetry anthologies for young readers, including Time You Let Me In, This Same Sky, The Space Between Our Footsteps: Poems & Paintings from the Middle East, What Have You Lost?, and Transfer. Her collection of poems for young adults entitled Honeybee won the 2008 Arab American Book Award in the Children’s/Young Adult category. Her new novel for children, The Turtle of Oman, was chosen both a Best Book of 2014 by The Horn Book and a 2015 Notable Children's Book by the American Library Association.

Website

Thursday, November 2

Ujjwala Maharjan

Ujjwala Maharjan is a spoken word poet and educator from Nepal. She is a co-founder of Nepal's first spoken word poetry group who call themselves the Word Warriors. She was the Program Coordinator for Write to Speak, a campaign run by the Word Warriors to introduce spoken word poetry to youth from diverse communities, focusing on women and other marginalized groups. After three years of traveling to different parts of her country as a full-time poetry instructor, meeting young people and hearing their stories, she is taking her time right now to reflect on the experience. Deeply affected by the lives of some of the students she met on her journey who are still struggling with basic literacy skills, she is trying to explore ways storytelling and other art and expression based tools like spoken word can assist literacy. She is currently a UNESCO fellow pursuing her Master's in International Education Development Program at the University of Pennsylvania. In her dreams, however, she is still back home - teaching poetry.

Website

 Tuesday, November 21

Malu Halasa

Malu Halasa is Jordanian Filipina American writer and editor based in London. Born in Oklahoma, she was raised in Ohio and is a graduate of Barnard College, Columbia University. Her books include: Syria Speaks – Art and Culture from the Frontline (2014); Transit Tehran: Young Iran and Its Inspirations (2009); The Secret Life of Syrian Lingerie: Intimacy and Design (2008); Kaveh Golestan: Recording the Truth in Iran (2007); Transit Beirut: New Writing and Images (2004) and Creating Spaces of Freedom: Culture in Defiance (2002).

Mother of All Pigs is her first novel.

Website

 Thursday, April 26

Azar Nafisi

Azar Nafisi is best known as the author of the national bestseller Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books, which electrified its readers with a compassionate and often harrowing portrait of the Islamic revolution in Iran and how it affected one university professor and her students. Earning high acclaim and an enthusiastic readership, Reading Lolita in Tehran is an incisive exploration of the transformative powers of fiction in a world of tyranny. The book has spent over 117 weeks on The New York Times bestseller list. Reading Lolita in Tehran has been translated in 32 languages, and has won diverse literary awards, including the Prix du Meilleur Livre Étranger, Non-fiction Book of the Year Award from Booksense, the Frederic W. Ness Book Award, the Latifeh Yarsheter Book Award, the Grand Prix des Lectrices de Elle, and an achievement award from the American Immigration Law Foundation, as well as being a finalist for the PEN/Martha Albrand Award for Memoir. In 2006 she won a Persian Golden Lioness Award for literature, presented by the World Academy of Arts, Literature, and Media. In 2009 Reading Lolita in Tehran was named as one of the “100 Best Books of the Decade” by The Times (London).

Website







 

2016 Visiting Writers

Tuesday, September 20

                                                      

Kyle Kondik 

Kyle Kondik, a widely cited expert on American campaigns and elections, is managing editor of Sabato’s Crystal Ball, a nonpartisan political tipsheet produced by the University of Virginia Center for Politics. He is from Greater Cleveland and lives in Washington, D.C.

Website

Thursday, September 29

Clint Smith

presented in partnership with the Center for Multicultural Affairs and the Hathaway Brown Parent Association

Clint Smith is a writer, teacher, and Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University. He is a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow and was named the 2013 Christine D. Sarbanes Teacher of the Year by the Maryland Humanities Council. He is a 2014 National Poetry Slam champion, a Cave Canem Fellow, and his writing has appeared or is forthcoming in The New Yorker, American Poetry Review, The Guardian, and Boston Review. His TED Talks, The Danger of Silence and How to Raise a Black Son in America have been collectively viewed more than four million times. His first full-length collection of poems, Counting Descent, is forthcoming from Write Bloody Publishing on September 15.

Website

Friday, September 30

 

Peter LaBerge

Peter LaBerge is the author of the chapbooks Makeshift Cathedral (YesYes Books, 2017) and Hook (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2015), recently acquired by the U.S. Library of Congress and included on the American Library Association's Over the Rainbow List. His work appears in Beloit Poetry Journal, Best New Poets 2014, Colorado Review, Indiana Review, Iowa Review, Pleiades, Sixth Finch, and Washington Square Review, among others. He is the recipient of a fellowship from the Bucknell University Stadler Center for Poetry and the founder and editor-in-chief of The Adroit Journal. He lives in Philadelphia, where he is an undergraduate student at the University of Pennsylvania.

Website

Wednesday, October 5
Thursday, October 6

Heather Christle 

Heather Christle (pronounced “crystal”) is the author of What Is Amazing (Wesleyan University Press, 2012), The Difficult Farm (Octopus Books, 2009), and The Trees The Trees (Octopus Books, 2011), which won the 2012 Believer Poetry Award. A new collection, Heliopause, was published in spring 2015. Her poems have appeared in publications including Boston Review, Gulf Coast, The New Yorker, and The Best American Poetry. She has taught poetry at Antioch College, Sarah Lawrence College, the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Emory University, where she was the 2009-2011 Poetry Writing Fellow. A native of Wolfeboro, New Hampshire, she lives in Yellow Springs, Ohio.

Website

 Thursday, October 27

Anchee Min

2016 H. William Christ Keynote Speaker, presented in partnership with the Center for Global Citizenship and the Hathaway Brown Parent Association

Anchee Min’s writing has been praised for its raw, sharp language and historical accuracy. Her bestselling memoir, Red Azalea, the story of her childhood in communist China, has been compared to The Diary of Anne Frank. Min credits the English language with giving her a means to express herself, arming her with the voice and vocabulary to write about growing up during China’s Cultural Revolution. “There was no way for me to describe those experiences or talk about those feelings in Chinese,” she has said of a language too burdened by Maoist rhetoric. Today, she writes candidly about events she was once encouraged to bury. The New York Times has called her “a wild, passionate and fearless American writer.” Her latest book continues where her bestselling memoir Red Azalea left off. The Cooked Seed: A Memoir tells the story of Min’s struggles to find herself in a new land.

Website

 Thursday, November 3

Alexandra Fuller

Alexandra Fuller has written numerous books, including Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood (Random House 2001), which was a New York Times Notable Book for 2002, the 2002 Booksense Best Non-fiction book, a finalist for the Guardian’s First Book Award, and the winner of the 2002 Winifred Holtby Memorial Prize. Her 2004 Scribbling the Cat: Travels with an African Soldier (Penguin Press) won the Ulysses Prize for Art of Reportage. She also is the author of The Legend of Colton H Bryant (2008 Penguin Press). She contributed the essay about Wyoming that appears in the 2008 book State by State: A Panoramic Portrait of America. Fuller’s book Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness (Penguin 2011), is a prequel/sequel to Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight. Her latest book, a memoir of marriage and divorce, is entitled Leaving Before the Rains Come (January, 2015). Fuller has written extensively for magazines and newspapers, and her work has appeared in The New Yorker, Vogue, and National Geographic.

Website

 Thursday, November 3

Sarah Kay 

Sarah Kay grew up in New York City and began performing her poetry when she was only 14 years old. Even though she was often the youngest poet by a decade, Sarah made herself at home at the Bowery Poetry Club, one of New York's most famous Spoken Word venues. In 2006, she joined the Bowery Poetry Club's Poetry Slam Team, NYC Urbana, and competed in the 2006 National Poetry Slam in Austin, Texas. That year, she was the youngest poet competing at Nationals. Sarah was featured on the sixth season of the television series Russell Simmons presents HBO Def Poetry Jam, where she performed her poem "Hands." She has performed in venues across the country including Lincoln Center, the Tribeca Film Festival, and the United Nations, where she was a featured performer for the launch of the 2004 World Youth Report. She has also performed internationally in the Czech Republic, the United Kingdom, India, South Africa, the United Arab Emirates, France, Spain, Sweden, Australia, Mexico, and Singapore. In 2004, Sarah founded Project V.O.I.C.E. and has since taught Spoken Word Poetry in classrooms and workshops all over the world, to students of all ages. Sarah was a featured speaker at the 2011 TED conference on "The Rediscovery of Wonder" in Long Beach, California. Sarah's first book, B (published by the Domino Project) has been ranked #1 bestselling poetry book on Amazon.

Website

 Thursday, November 3

Jamaal May

Jamaal May was born in 1982 in Detroit, Mich., where he taught poetry in public schools and worked as a freelance audio engineer. His first book is Hum (Alice James Books), which received the American Library Association’s Notable Book Award, Foreword Review’s Book of the Year Silver Medal, and an NAACP Image Award nomination. In 2014 Jamaal received more than a dozen awards and honors including the Spirit of Detroit Award, the Robert Frost Fellowship to Bread Loaf Writers Conference, The J. Howard and Barbara M. J. Wood Prize from Poetry, and a Civitella Ranieri Fellowship in Italy. His poems appear widely in magazines and have been anthologized in Please Excuse this Poem: 100 Poems for the Next Generation (Penguin), 2015 Pushcart Prize Anthology (Pushcart Press), Best American Poetry 2014 (Scribner), and elsewhere. Jamaal is a Kenyon Review Fellow and co-directs Organic Weapon Arts with Tarfia Faizullah.

Website

Monday, November 14
Tuesday, November 15

 

Hanif Abdurraqib

Hanif Abdurraqib is a poet, writer, and cultural critic from Columbus, Ohio. His essays and music criticism have been published in The FADER, Pitchfork, The New Yorker, and The New York Times. With Big Lucks, Hanif released a limited edition chapbook, Vintage Sadness, in Summer 2017. He is a Callaloo Creative Writing Fellow and previously worked for MTV News, where he wrote about the intersections of music, culture, and identity. Hanif also wrote the 2016 live shows: MTV Video Music Awards and VH1’s Unsilent Night. His first full length collection, The Crown Ain't Worth Much, was one of 2016's best-selling poetry books and was named a finalist for the Eric Hoffer Book prize. Hanif's debut collection of essays, titled They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us, was published November of 2017 via Two Dollar Radio. He is a member of the poetry collective Echo Hotel with poet/essayist Eve L. Ewing.

Website



  

... and check out these impressive past speakers who have visited the Osborne Writing Center at HB. Many have become good friends of the school and come back to see us often.

Top row L-R: David Giffels, Jamaal May, Michael Dirda, Billy Collins, Naomi Shihab Nye
Middle row L-R: Marjane Satrapl, Paula McClain, Sarah Kay, Loung Ung, Alexandra Fuller
Bottom row L-R: Anchee Min, Clint Smith, Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib, Azar Nafisi, Malu Halasa

    

 

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