HATHAWAY BROWN SCHOOL

Upper School

Academic Handbook/Course Catalog

 Revised 2014


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

The Course Selection Process
Guidelines for Building a Program of Study
Minimum Graduation Requirements
Course Descriptions

            


The Course Selection Process

These pages contain descriptions of all Upper School courses. Using this booklet as a guide, you can construct your academic program. Courses are listed by academic department and contain specific information about each course offered. Refer to the descriptions as needed. If you have any questions relating to a course, ask one of the department heads, the Director of Upper School (Mrs. Sadler), the Director of College Counseling (Dr. McCue), or the Registrar (Ms. Burtch).

As you make your decisions about your program, consult "Guidelines for Building a Program of Study" in the following section. While the freshman and sophomore curricula are fairly well defined, the junior and senior years allow greater choice. The process for course selection is as follows:

  1. Discuss your course selection options with your mentor. Your teachers will have recommended appropriate placement in courses. Check that your program meets the minimum departmental and graduation requirements. Be sure that you are not committing yourself to an academic program beyond your abilities to manage. Keep in mind the relationship of your course load to your interest in or commitment to anticipated extracurricular activities and interscholastic athletics.
  2. Discuss your course selection options with your parents. Show them the course descriptions. You must have a parent’s/guardian’s signature on the final Course Selection Sheet.
  3. Return the completed sheet to your mentor. If it can be scheduled, the program that you select now will be considered binding for the next year.

It is imperative that the course selections you make now reflect serious thought and commitment.


Guidelines for Building a Program of Study

Unless otherwise approved by the Director of Upper School or Director of College Counseling, students will take a minimum of five credits each year. In most cases, the student should build a course of study consisting of five full-credit academic courses from these disciplines: English, History, Mathematics, World Language, and Science. Before the end of four years, students must meet the minimum credit requirements for each academic discipline.

Minimum departmental requirements for graduation:

English4 credits
Mathematics4 credits (can include Algebra 1)
Science3 credits(including Biology, Chemistry, Physics)
History3 credits (including History 1: Ancient and US History)
World Language3 credits in one language in the Upper School
Visual and/or Performing Arts1 credit (2-4 semesters)
Physical Education1/2 credit or exemption (including PE 100/101)
Health Education1/2 credit
Computer Science* (Starting with Class of 20181/4 credit (Exploring Computer Science)
Electives1 credit
Non-credit requirementsSenior Speech, Senior Project


The Senior Speech is a four-minute presentation required of each senior before the entire Upper School. The completion of a Senior Project is also required for graduation.

In exceptional situations, Independent Study courses may be taken. A written proposal for independent study must be approved by the Director of Upper School and the supervising teacher.

With the exception of courses taken at approved semester or year-away programs, courses from other institutions will generally not receive Hathaway Brown School credit.  In the event a student has exhausted the course options available at Hathaway Brown, she may apply to take an advanced course at another institution and if approved, will receive credit.


Course Descriptions

ENGLISH

At every grade level, the Upper School English Department is dedicated to developing the skills and behaviors that enhance reading, writing, thinking and speaking. In reaching this mission, we engage our students in the study of a wide variety of literary texts. We want each reader to form her own perspective and opinion and to express herself with clarity and conviction. We believe that each student can advance her level of competence in a variety of compositional models and styles, and proficiently apply the standard conventions of usage. In the classroom, we foster an atmosphere of active participation and mutual respect.


Critical Reading & Writing 1 (English 1)


The heart of this course is grounded in two inseparable practices: reading and writing. The noted author, Francine Prose, asserts that one must be a great reader before one can become a good writer. This course will intertwine the two entities so that students are learning good writing practices from the very texts they read. Our texts will become springboards for intensive work in mastering analytical thinking and writing. Along the way, students will also hone vocabulary and grammar skills, become discussion leaders, learn to work independently and in groups, and keep commonplace books that allow them to reflect on and interact with each text. Above all, the course is designed to enhance students’ appreciation for great literature while giving them the foundation they need to flourish in subsequent Upper School English classes. Along the way, they gain confidence in their own unique analytical gifts and critical "voices."

This course offers a sampler of paired texts that explore both the pillars of the canon and modern multicultural works inspired by their classical counterparts. Paired texts allow us to explore the ongoing influence of some of the world’s most ancient and revered works on modern writers. In a sense, we can hear the dialogue that happens between genres, ages, and authors, even as we learn how to make our voices part of that academic conversation. 
1 credit, full-year, 9th grade requirement


Critical Reading & Writing 2 (English 2)

English in the 10th grade emphasizes critical reading, facility with the analytical essay, editing skills, and expanding word recognition.

Readings will be taken from full-length works of world literature, supplemented by short fiction. The literary objective will be to view human experience from multiple perspectives and hear the voices of diverse peoples around the globe. Students will hone their interpretive reading skills and their knowledge of the tools writers use to construct meaning. Writing will develop facility with the critical essay and include the creative, persuasive, and theme-based essays, in addition to expanding a sense of structure, presentation, and style. To broaden their writing experiences, students may write in-class essays, short timed responses, and/or overnight mini essays. A student’s progress will be based on papers, close reading exercises, vocabulary and writing skills tests, class participation, and overall preparedness.
1 credit, full-year, 10th grade


Critical Reading & Writing 2 Honors (English 2 Honors)

English at the Honors level is designed to meet the needs of advanced students who have exhibited exemplary achievement in previous English courses and are sufficiently mature for a quicker-paced syllabus, for more independent follow-through on assignments, for insightful and imaginative engagement of literature, and for emphasis on refining the critical essay. British and world literature will provide the reading material for the course, with emphasis placed on close, thoughtful interpretation of texts. Instruction in writing underscores a deepening appreciation for the process and substance of composition, and advanced topics of usage, style, and structure challenge the best in a writer. The course favors those who actively engage ideas, those who read critically, and those who delight in literate conversation.
1 credit, full-year, 10th  grade. Prerequisite: departmental approval


English 3 (The American Literary Tradition )

English in the 11th grade exposes students to the rich variety of American voices as it poses the question of what it means to be American. Longer core texts are taken primarily from the 19th and 20th centuries, supplemented by poetry, short stories, and essays. Issues such as race, gender, class, and the relationship of the individual to society are examined from a variety of perspectives. Emphasis is placed on using discussions to advance understanding and provide alternate ways of viewing a text. Students will write persuasively, analytically, and reflectively in a variety of forms. In addition, the course aims to help students sharpen grammar skills, expand vocabulary fluency, speak confidently, listen well, and think critically.
1 credit, full-year, 11th grade


AP English Language and Composition

AP Junior English exposes students to a wide range of literary and rhetorical works from a variety of genres and nonfiction works primarily from the American literary tradition. In this Advanced Placement course in English Language and Composition, students will have the opportunity to earn possible college credit, so the pace and workload are demanding, and the standards and expectations are high. Students should enter the course with a strong background in composition and are expected to engage actively in class discussions. Written assignments will include essays that are analytical and persuasive, as well as personal and reflective.

Through composing both frequent impromptu and prepared essays, students will gain a deeper sense of writers’ stylistic choices, including syntax, diction, tone, classical appeals, and figurative language. Simultaneously, the course aims to help students sharpen grammar skills, expand vocabulary fluency, speak confidently, listen well, and think critically.
1 credit, full-year, 11th grade.  Prerequisite: departmental approval


AP English Literature and Composition

AP Literature is comparable to a freshman college English course. The texts are chosen to reflect material that is frequently tested on the exam, to highlight a diversity of genres, periods, and writers, and to focus on writers who are acknowledged masters of their craft. In nearly every instance, these texts transformed a form, introduced a new idea, or elevated the art of writing to new heights. We read Nobel, Pulitzer, National Book Award, and Booker Prize winners, and writers who erected the foundations on which these more modern writers built the enduring architecture of words. While preparation for the exam is one goal for this class, it is by no means the only or even the most important one. The class is designed to enhance students’ appreciation for great literature, to inspire them to push their intellectual boundaries, hone analytical thinking and writing skills, master the vocabulary and tools of critical analysis, develop more sophisticated vocabulary skills, and garner a more nuanced and comprehensive sense of the riches that this discipline offers.
1 credit, full-year, 12th grade.  Prerequisite: AP Language & Composition, departmental approval.  Course serves as capstone experience for the Osborne Writing Center Designation.


English 4 Creative Writing  (Honors option)

Open any modern book or magazine and you will find writers experimenting with new ways to understand and respond to the world we live in now. These writers make meaning and discover meaning, pursue truth and create beauty, comfort their readers and disturb them. In this class we will do the same. We will also explore the habits of mind that lead to fresh and creative writing (and living). We will study and create stories, poems, essays, memoirs and plays that will explore the world you live in, the people you know, and the issues you confront.
1 credit, full-year, 12th grade.  Honors course serves as a capstone experience for the Osborne Writing Center designation.

Contemporary World Literature (Honors option)

Through the study of contemporary literature from several continents, students will explore the social, cultural, and political issues that artists across the world find most compelling, complicated, and worthy of deep exploration through art.  How do individuals, communities, and entire cultures maintain their traditions and identities while also adapting to the increasingly connected modern world?  What are the effects of the global economy on the individual's search for meaning?  How do traditional families deal with children who disrupt tradition?  Is the world really becoming flat?  Students in the course will pursue their own questions of interest and honors students will produce a thesis.
1 credit, full-year, 12th grade.  Honors course serves as a capstone experience for the Global Scholars or Osborne Writing Center designations.

 

MATHEMATICS

There is an increasing need in society for individuals who can solve new problems in scientific, economic, technological and other quantitative fields.  Logical thinking and quantitative reasoning are increasingly important skills in all areas of life.  The Mathematics Department provides a strong foundation in mathematics and offers courses that are designed to provide the best possible mathematics background for each student.  At HB, students learn to value mathematics and its place in society, to reason mathematically and to communicate in the language of mathematics.  Students are challenged to apply mathematics to real-world situations.  As a result, HB mathematics students become risk-takers and problem-solvers.

We value the ideal of full- participating students and an enthusiastic, prepared teacher working together in an atmosphere of mutual respect.  Students learn by doing, by working cooperatively in groups, by working closely with teachers, by discussing, by writing, by reading, and by using technology to enhance their understanding of concepts.  In developing the basis for lifelong learning in a rapidly changing society, they become comfortable with the language and notation of mathematics.  They learn to interpret numerical and graphical information and to express ideas quantitatively.  The integration of technology throughout the curriculum teaches students how and when to use these tools.  Our mathematics courses challenge our students to think creatively and they promote a justifiable confidence in their ability to think mathematically in academic and nonacademic situations now and in the future.

Mathematics courses are relevant and exciting learning experiences.  At all levels, we aspire to challenge students while structuring our courses to promote enjoyment and success.


Integrated Algebra

This introductory course serves as a bridge between a traditional Algebra 1 course and a Geometry course.  It is designed for students who entered HB without a full year of Algebra, and helps them prepare thoroughly to continue into Geometry and Algebra 2.  Topics covered include linear, quadratic, and exponential functions and inequalities; roots and powers; systems of equations; properties of polygons; and transformations.  These topics are also supplemented with individual topics as needed for each student.
1 credit, full-year. 

Geometry

This course, which follows Algebra 1, introduces the student to the topics of Euclidean geometry.  Principles of logical reasoning are presented early and lead into the study of proof.  Topics studied include congruent and similar triangles, parallel lines, polygons, circles, the Pythagorean Theorem and right triangles, surface area and volume of solids, coordinate geometry and transformations.  Algebraic concepts and skills are interwoven into each geometric lesson, as geometry gives visual meaning to algebra.  Mathematics is seen as a continuum that builds on the algebra experience.  Communication in the language of mathematics is emphasized.  The student learns to make connections, solve problems and experience the world from a geometric viewpoint.
1 credit, full-year.  Prerequisite: Algebra 1 or Integrated Algebra


Geometry Honors

This course is offered following Algebra 1 as an alternative to Geometry for those students who were recommended as having shown superior aptitude, achievement and interest.  Geometry Honors introduces students to the topics of Euclidean geometry, with a strong emphasis on the nature of deductive proof.  Much time is spent in learning to reason and to explore the axiomatic structure of mathematics.  Topics studied include those of Geometry, but are covered in greater depth and move at a brisk pace with emphasis on challenging problems.  Algebra is integrated throughout each lesson.  The thrust of the course is to develop an understanding of the nature of the proof in critical thinking and to hone spatial reasoning skills to allow for a geometric interpretation of the student's physical environment.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: departmental approval and Algebra 1 or Integrated Algebra


Algebra 2

The second year of algebra focuses on the study of functions.  This course covers properties of functions in general, and linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, power and logarithmic functions in particular.  It also covers several related topics, including variation, matrices, sequences and series, systems of equations, and basic trigonometry.  There is a focus on real-world problem solving, mathematical reasoning and communicating mathematically.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Geometry or Geometry Honors


Algebra 2 Honors

This course is offered as an alternative to the required Algebra 2 and is recommended to students who have shown superior interest, aptitude, and achievement.  It assumes a mastery of algebra skills and covers all the topics of Algebra 2, but more quickly and in greater depth.  Additional topics such as the graphing of higher degree polynomials, rational functions, conic sections and an extended study of trigonometry are included in the curriculum.  Throughout the year, there is an emphasis on analyzing and solving challenging applications.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: departmental approval and either Geometry Honors or equivalent


Statistics and Precalculus

In this course, topics from Algebra 2 and Geometry, such as functions, transformations, sequences and triangles, are reviewed and extended.  Students study descriptive and inferential statistics, and they use data to model real-life phenomena.  Trigonometric (circular), exponential, logarithmic and other elementary functions are studied in depth and used to model applications in science, economics, population growth and other areas.  While the continuing development of algebraic skills is a goal of the course, major emphasis is also placed on using reasoning skills and technological tools in problem solving.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Algebra 2


Precalculus AB Honors

In this course, topics from algebra and geometry including functions, probability, and matrices are extended and applied in new situations.  Circular functions and analytic trigonometry are studied in detail.  New concepts such as vectors are investigated, and the concept of limits is introduced in preparation for a thorough investigation in a subsequent calculus course.  Precalculus AB Honors is designed to challenge students who have demonstrated high achievement and interest in previous courses.  In particular, this course provides a background for students who elect to study calculus, or to a lesser extent, discrete mathematics, in the future.  Successful completion of this course prior to the 12th grade enables a student to take Advanced Placement Calculus AB.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: departmental approval and Algebra 2 Honors or equivalent


Precalculus BC Honors

This course is designed to challenge students who have demonstrated very high achievement and interest in previous mathematics courses.  Topics from algebra and geometry, such as finite series and analytic geometry, are extended and applied in new situations.  All topics listed in the description of Precalculus AB Honors are covered, but at a faster pace and in greater depth.  New concepts such as vectors, parametric equations, and polar coordinates are studied in detail.  Approximately one-third of the year is devoted to the exploration of circular functions (trigonometry).  Functions, applications, and graphing are emphasized throughout the course, and students will make extensive use of graphing calculators.  Topics from introductory calculus, such as limits, continuity and derivatives, are treated rigorously during the final third of the school year. Successful completion of this course prior to the 12th grade enables a student to take Advanced Placement Calculus BC.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: departmental approval and Algebra 2 Honors or equivalent


Discrete Mathematics with Calculus

This elective course is designed to provide both a sound theoretical basis and a challenging experience in real-life applications in mathematics while completing the student's preparation for college-level mathematics, including differential calculus, computer science, and mathematics courses for business majors. Due to the breadth and depth of the mathematics in the course, it is a solid foundation for and a good introduction to the calculus. Discrete mathematics topics include symbolic logic, graph theory, combinatorics, and recursion. Precalculus topics include analyzing functions, polynomials, rational functions, and the field of complex numbers. Calculus topics include limits, difference quotients, and an introduction to the derivative.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Statistics and Precalculus or Precalculus Honors


AP Calculus AB

This elective is a college-level calculus course.  It is designed to develop the student’s understanding of the concepts of differential and integral calculus and provide experience with its methods and applications.  The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally.  The connections among these representations are explored in depth.  Technology is used regularly to reinforce the relationships among the multiple representations of functions, to confirm written work, to implement experimentation, and to assist in interpreting results.  The course begins with discussions of limits and continuity and progresses to the differential and integral calculus of elementary functions.  The syllabus closely follows, but is not limited to, the recommendations of the College Entrance Examination Board.  Students are required to sit for the AP Calculus examination at the end of the school year.  We have found that successful students in this challenging and demanding course have a history of very high achievement and consistent diligence and in previous mathematics courses.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: departmental approval and Precalculus AB Honors or equivalent


AP Calculus BC

This elective is a college-level calculus course.  It is designed to develop the student’s understanding of the concepts of differential and integral calculus and provide experience with its methods and applications.  This course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically and verbally.  Technology is used regularly to explore in depth the connections among these representations.  Since Calculus BC is an extension of Calculus AB, the concepts discussed include all of those in Calculus AB.  Additional topics include derivatives of parametric, polar, and vector functions, improper integrals, and Taylor series.  The syllabus closely follows, but is not limited to the recommendations of the College Entrance Examination Board.  Students are required to sit for the AP Calculus examination at the end of the school year.  We have found that successful students in this challenging and demanding course have a history of very high achievement and consistent diligence in previous mathematics courses.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: departmental approval and Precalculus BC Honors or equivalent


AP Statistics

This elective is a college-level introductory statistics course.  The major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data are developed in this course; students are expected to use statistics to analyze challenging applications problems.  Calculus concepts will be incorporated to show evolution of statistical principles and formulas.  The course syllabus will include the topics recommended by the College Entrance Examination Board.  Students are required to sit for the AP Statistics examination at the end of the school year.  Concepts developed include exploring data, planning a study, anticipating patterns and statistical inference.  In addition, the course will include extensive problem solving involving computer modeling of real-life data to propose solutions to complex problems.  Students in this course should have a history of very high achievement and consistent diligence in previous mathematics courses.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: departmental approval and satisfactory completion of or concurrent enrollment in Calculus


Calculus 2 with Probability Theory Honors

This elective is a college-level course. It is designed for students that have performed well in Advanced Placement Calculus AB and desire to continue to build on that knowledge. The course includes both an extension of the calculus and a calculus-based introduction to the theory of probability, a foundation for a wide range of fields such as actuarial mathematics and finance. Calculus topics include integrals of trigonometric functions, partial fraction decomposition, and integration by parts, parametric, vector, and polar functions, and infinite series. Probability topics include set theory, counting methods, conditional probability and independence, and Bayes’ formula, and discrete and continuous random variables.

Although this is not an Advanced Placement TM class, students will be prepared for the AP Calculus BC exam, and can choose to take it in May.
1 credit, full-year.  Prerequisite: departmental approval and AP Calculus AB or equivalent

 

Calculus 3 Honors (Post Calculus)

This elective is a college-level course.  It is designed to offer students who have completed AP Calculus BC a theoretical mathematics course alternative to Advanced Placement Statistics.  The topics covered might vary from year to year, but typical topics include vectors in three-space, multiple variable functions, Calculus of three or more dimensions, multiple integrals and applications, line integrals, and differential equations.  Proof will be a major component of the course. 
1 credit, full-year.  Prerequisite: departmental approval and AP Calculus BC or equivalent


SCIENCE

As our global society continues to expand and develop, the Science Department believes an understanding of the concepts and processes of science is essential.  Scientific knowledge must be paired with the decision-making processes that shape policy.  We strive to convey the importance of science in everyday life and to create an environment that values and stimulates independent thought and problem- solving skills.  At all levels we seek to challenge the mind of the individual, offering a wide variety of investigative science.  We believe that the ability to communicate methods and solutions is essential, and we seek to teach each student to observe and report accurately.  We believe that experience in the lab develops curiosity about the world around us and the skills and desire to discover the unknown.  We hope to impart to our students a lifelong appreciation of our world, to open their minds to new ideas, and to leave them with the ability to critically analyze problems and solutions.


Biology

Biology is an introductory course for 9th graders.  It attempts to define "life," emphasizing the unity of function within the diversity of life forms through class discussions, lectures, and laboratory investigations.  Topics covered include chemical and cellular basis of life, energy processes of living cells, reproduction and genetics, origins and evolution, taxonomy and classification systems, single-celled and multicellular organisms and their unifying systems, and ecology.  This course strives to promote an awareness of and appreciation for the intricacy and interdependence of living things.  Evaluation of student achievement is by written tests, exams, quizzes, lab reports, projects, oral presentations, and class participation.
1 credit, full-year


Chemistry

Chemistry is a full-year comprehensive study of the structure and properties of matter.  Through a combination of lecture, discussion, and laboratory, fundamental concepts and problem-solving skills are developed.  Emphasis is placed on connections with the surrounding world.  Topics of study include chemical symbols and equations, formulas, atomic theory, the mole concept, kinetics, thermodynamics, acid-base chemistry, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Students develop the ability to make precise measurements and careful observations. Both qualitative and quantitative interpretations of these results are presented in logical, well-written lab reports.  Student achievement is assessed through homework, quizzes, tests, laboratory reports, class participation, and laboratory technique.
1 credit, full-year. Co-requisite: Algebra 2


Chemistry Honors

Chemistry Honors is a full-year comprehensive study of the structure and properties of matter.  Theoretical concepts are developed through lectures and discussions, and are observed in the laboratory.  Topics include chemical symbols, formulas, atomic theory, kinetics, thermodynamics, solutions, the mole concept, equilibrium, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry.  Classroom activities stress practical applications to everyday life, precise measurements, careful observations, logical interpretation of results, problem solving, and reporting laboratory results in logical, well-written lab reports. Student achievement is assessed through quizzes, tests, lab reports, class participation, and laboratory technique.
1 credit, full-year. Co-rerequisite: Algebra 2 and departmental approval


Physics

Physics is a study of the relationship between matter and energy and the laws of nature. Theoretical and experimental concepts are developed by lectures, class discussions, and observations in the laboratory. Topics include mechanics, electricity, magnetism, waves, sound, and light.  Students will develop skills in making careful observations of everyday occurrences, organizing data, and explaining their findings in logical, well-written lab reports. 
1 credit, full-year.    Prerequisite:  Algebra 2


Physics Honors

Physics is a study of the relationship between matter and energy and the laws of nature. Theoretical and experimental concepts are developed by lectures, class discussions, and observations in the laboratory. Honors Physics will cover Classical Mechanics, Electricity. Magnetism, Waves, Sound, Light, Optics and Modern Physics.  Students will develop skills in making careful observations of everyday occurrences, organizing data, and explaining their findings in logical, well-written lab reports. The pace of the course will be faster than Physics. This will be the pre-requisite course for AP Physics as well as fulfill the graduation requirement.
1 credit, full-year.    Prerequisite:  Algebra 2 and departmental approval                                        

AP Biology

AP Biology is a full-year lab course offered to juniors or seniors with a strong background in biology and chemistry.  The course is equivalent to the general biology survey course usually taken during the first year of college.  Students gain experience and appreciation of biology through experimentation and inquiry.  The course emphasizes critical thinking skills, essay and laboratory writing skills, and data analysis skills.  AP Biology is a rigorous, fast-paced course and students must be prepared to devote considerable time and energy to it in order to perform well on the required College Entrance Examination Board AP Biology exam.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Biology, Chemistry, departmental approval


AP Chemistry

Students with a background in chemistry are offered this second full-year course, which is the equivalent to the general chemistry survey course usually taken during the first year of college.  It is designed to further explore the chemical concepts mastered during the initial chemistry course with heavy emphasis on problem solving and laboratory investigations and reporting. The College Entrance Examination Board AP Chemistry exam is taken in the spring. Evaluation is based on tests, quizzes, class participation, and problem sets.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Chemistry Honors and departmental approval


AP Physics C

The AP Physics C course is a second full-year physics course offered to students with a background in physics.  The Physics C course is a full year devoted to mechanics.  The use of calculus in problem solving and in derivations is expected to increase as the course progresses.  Calculus is used freely in formulating principles and problem solving.  The understanding of basic physics principles and the ability to apply these principles to high-level problems is the major goal of this course.  Basic demonstrations and laboratory experiments are considered essential for the reinforcement and understanding of physics concepts.  The College Entrance Examination Board AP Physics C exam is taken in the spring.  Evaluation of student achievement is through tests, problem sets, quizzes, lab reports, lab technique and class participation.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Physics, AP Calculus (or currently enrolled in AP Calculus), departmental approval

 

Ecology

Ecology is the study of the interactions between organisms and their terrestrial or aquatic environments. This course will provide a background in the fundamental principles of ecology including life on a global scale, energy flow, cycles of matter, population, community, and ecosystem ecology, ecological succession, biomes and humans in the biosphere. Students will acquire an “ecological literacy” about the natural world and develop an understanding of how methods of ecological study are used to construct ecological knowledge.  The course will also explore some of the major ecological challenges facing us today and the important research that is being done to address these concerns.
1 credit, full-year.  Prerequisite: Biology

 

Anatomy and Physiology

Anatomy and Physiology is an elective, introductory, full-year lab course about the human body and how it functions.  Emphasis is placed on in-depth study of the human systems, how they are interrelated and maintain homeostasis.  Topics covered include medical terminology, biochemistry, cell structure and function, energetics, molecular biology, histology, and the anatomy and physiology of the human body systems.  Laboratory investigations include basic biology, microscopy, histology, anatomical studies using dissection, and the study of physiological processes via experimentation.  Evaluation of student achievement is through written tests, homework, lab reports, special projects, and oral presentations.
1 credit, full-year.  Prerequisite: Biology


AP Environmental Science

AP Environmental Science is a comprehensive course designed to provide students with the principles, concepts, and methodologies necessary to understand contemporary environmental issues of both local and global proportion.  The course is equivalent to a one-semester introductory college course and is open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors with a solid background in chemistry and the life sciences.  Through literature, familiarity with current scientific research, and student-centered discussion, participants will explore topics of global climate change, energy use, ecosystem dynamics, land use, water quality, air quality, and population growth.  The interconnectedness of all life will serve as a unifying theme for this course.  Concepts will be reinforced through hands-on experimentation both in the lab and in the field.  Emphasis will be placed on the critical role of humans in promoting sustainability through conservation and technological advancement.  Students will research topics of personal interest and, working collaboratively with peers, will begin to propose solutions to modern environmental problems.  This course is designed to promote critical thought about real-world developments.  Upon completion of the course, students will take the College Board AP Environmental Science exam.
1 credit, full-year.  Prerequisite: Biology, Chemistry, departmental approval


Organic Chemistry

Organic Chemistry is a full-year introduction to the study of carbon-based compounds.  Through a combination of lecture, discussion, demonstration, laboratory, and modeling, the fundamental reactions of organic molecules are explored.  Emphasis is placed on understanding the mechanisms by which organic compounds react.  Topics of study include electronic structure and covalent bonding, nomenclature and representation of organic molecules, structure and reactivity of alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes, stereochemistry, aromatic compounds and the delocalization of electrons, and spectroscopy.  Student achievement is assessed through homework, quizzes, tests, and class participation.
½  credit, full-year.  Prerequisite: Chemistry or  Chemistry  Honors, departmental approval


HISTORY

The History Department requires that Upper School students take three full years of history.  Core courses include History 1: Ancient, History 2: Modern, AP World History, U.S. History, and AP U.S. History.  In addition, drawing from other disciplines in the social sciences, including anthropology, economics, sociology, and political science, HB students view more deeply than from the simple perspective of "what happened in the past."  The department's overall goal is for students to approach the past thoughtfully and reflectively, and consequently become better equipped to judiciously evaluate the contemporary world.  The department emphasizes writing and research.  Students learn how to draw from primary and secondary sources and shape their ideas into well-supported cogent pieces of writing.  Whether our students go on to write for the medical, legal, business, or science professions, they will be grounded in the form and substance of research paper writing.

The following goals serve as unifying themes in the various courses:

  1. Students gain understanding of the historical forces that have shaped the contemporary world.
  2. Students gain understanding of the rise of world civilizations through exposure to conceptual framework.
  3. Students obtain a sense of the interdisciplinary nature of the social sciences and humanities.
  4. Students develop attitudes of respect for the opinions of others, an appreciation for the principle of individual rights, and an understanding of democratic decision-making.

History 1: Ancient

This course examines the foundations of our global community through the study of the cultural development and characteristics of selected ancient civilizations in Africa, Asia, and Europe.  Each unit of study stresses cross-cultural comparisons of the ways in which these differing peoples have answered a range of recurring questions: How shall we govern ourselves?  How shall we create and distribute wealth?  What are our religious and philosophical beliefs?  What arts do we consider important and beautiful?  What are the roles of women and the common peoples in our civilization?  Through our exploration of the past, students will develop a comprehensive understanding and appreciation of the world and the many ways of life different from their own.  Because Ancient Cultures is an introduction to HB’s secondary education social studies program, it emphasizes skills such as taking notes, analyzing literary and visual primary and secondary sources, and developing research techniques.  We also cultivate class discussions and an articulate prose style.  Students will complete two major research projects during the year. 
1 credit, full-year.


History 2: Modern

This course takes a global perspective in examining the events, ideas, and developments that have shaped our world since the 16th century.  Special emphasis is placed on the interconnectivity of historical processes as students explore the nature and patterns of interaction among the many different peoples and cultures of the world.  Particular attention is paid to the methods of an historian: analyzing literary and visual primary sources, comparing and contrasting multiple perspectives of history, evaluating historical problems and solutions, and hypothesizing about the influence and significance of the past.  Students complete two major research projects during the year.  
1 credit, full-year.


AP World History

AP World History examines world history from 1000CE to the present, and involves a foundations unit that predates 1000CE.  Global in nature, the class seeks to avoid a solely regional approach to world history and extensive memorization  of names, events, and dates.  Major themes such as cross-cultural interaction and conflict, and transcontinental, regional and global trade network development serve as major units of analysis for the class.  Also included are examination of historical change over time and cross-cultural comparative topics.  The ability to think critically and abstractly, as well as analytically and logically, is critical to the course. The majority of out-of-class coursework revolves around reading primary and secondary sources and developing argument-based free response and document based essays.  Students are expected to take the AP World History exam in May.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: departmental approval


US History (The American Odyssey)

The American Odyssey examines the development of the United States from colonial times through the 20th century.   The foundations and institutions that defined the United States in the past, and those that continue to define it today, are central to the course.  The Odyssey explores and analyzes America’s economic development, political beliefs and institutions, and military expansion.  The course also stresses the importance of the diverse cultures, beliefs and values that shaped the United States.  While particular time periods in American history, such as the Revolutionary and Civil War eras, the Progressive era, and the Depression era, are important to the course, specific themes such as civil rights, demographic change, cultural diversity, war and diplomacy, and globalization are important as well.  Analyses of literary and visual primary sources, multiple historical perspectives, and historical problems and solutions play major roles in the course.  Students complete three thesis-based research papers during the year.  Being able to read, write, and think critically are essential skills for this course.
1 credit, full-year.  Open to juniors and seniors.


AP US History

Advanced Placement United States History is a college-level course that surveys and analyzes the history of the United States from the Age of Exploration to the present.  The course focuses on specific themes, including racial, ethnic, class, religious, and gender diversity; American exceptionalism and competing views concerning what it means to be an American; American artistic, literary and cultural achievements; demographic change; economic development and transformation; America and the natural environment; globalization and the United States’ role in the world; American politics, citizenship and civil rights struggles; social reform movements, including slavery and its legacy; and war and diplomacy.  The course is also content-based.  In addition, students analyze and interpret primary sources throughout the year.  At the conclusion of the course, students take the Advanced Placement United States History exam, which has 80 multiple-choice questions, one thesis-based Document Based Essay, and two thesis-based Free Response Essays.                                                                                                                   
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite:  departmental approval 

AP Human Geography (online)

AP Human Geography introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students examine spatial concepts in relation to socioeconomic, political, and environmental issues. Critical skills employed in the course include interpreting maps and analyzing geospatial data, understanding and explaining the implications of associations and networks among phenomena in places, recognizing and interpreting the relationships among patterns and processes at different scales of analysis, defining regions and evaluating the regionalization process, and characterizing and analyzing changing interconnections among places. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May.
1 credit, full-year, all online.  Prerequisite:  History 2: Modern or AP Modern History.  Open to juniors and seniors.

Economic Policy Honors (Policy, Ethics, and Leadership)

The Economic Policy Honors course is designed to allow HB students to study micro- and macroeconomics through research, data analysis, case studies, and traditional models. The course introduces participants to key economic concepts, which are generally framed around important social issues and international topics.  Public, private and international economic policies are emphasized.  The course stresses the importance of civic, international and business ethics and emphasizes the necessity of informed decision making. Major course topics include unemployment, transitional economies, poverty, discrimination, Social Security, Medicare, monetary policy, fiscal policy, pollution, crime and crime prevention, monopoly and monopsony, protectionism, outsourcing, international labor issues, globalization, immigration, and trade policy.  A comprehensive policy research policy paper is required at the conclusion of the course.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: U.S. History or AP U.S. History and departmental approval.  Serves as a capstone experience for the Global Scholar and Business and Finance Fellow designations.


American Government and Constitutional Law (Honors option)

The American Government and Constitutional Law course introduces students to early American political thought and its crowning political achievement, the United States Constitution. The first part of the course focuses on The Federalist Papers and other original source documents from the founding period. Students will examine American political concepts such as natural rights, social compact theory, and religious liberty. This examination will occur through course reading and through analysis of the U.S. Constitution. Examination of such features as limited government, separation of powers, and the rule of law will provide a solid foundation for the study of the nation’s most important document.  The balance of the course will examine relevant case law and benchmark cases of the U.S. Supreme Court. Topics covered include judicial interpretation, freedom of religion and speech, the rights of the accused and criminal due process, cruel and unusual punishment, the right to privacy, the equal protection of the laws, judicial review, federalism, and the nature and scope of executive, legislative and judicial powers.  Students meeting departmental requirements may take the course for Honors credit.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: U.S. History or AP U.S. History.   Honors course serves as a capstone experience for the Global Scholar and Business and Finance Fellow designations.


Art History (Honors option)

This full-year junior and senior elective course is an overview of art from the Renaissance to the present day. This course focuses on exploring the work of crucial artists and movements, while nurturing an understanding of the cultural and societal trends represented in the art.  The course brings to life both the study of art and its history, while concurrently developing in the student a basic understanding of the aesthetics of Western art, knowledge of specific styles, and the ability to apply this knowledge in analysis, comparison, and criticism. The course is enhanced by trips to the Cleveland Museum of Art and other special field trips. Primarily, the course examines European and American art, developing in the student a core of knowledge based on crucial developments of artists and movements that best exemplify a given style, period, or era.  Developing a thesis in conjunction with the Global Scholars program is an option.  Students meeting departmental requirements may take the course for honors credit.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Hisotry 2: Modern or AP World History.  Honors course serves as a capstone experience for the Global Scholar designation.


International Relations Honors

International Relations is an introduction to international politics and the complexities of the modern world. Narrowly defined, international relations is the study of the relationship among the world's governments. However, students will examine myriad state and non-state actors and how they influence conflict and cooperation among nations. The course will study international relations theory, which is in part the study of why we have politics by violent means (war, terrorism, etc.), as well as politics by peaceful means (international law and organizations, treaties, etc.). The course also will study foreign policy itself, or the study of how nation-states and other actors make decisions and conduct their affairs in the international system. Students will approach the study of international relations and foreign policy as a complex discipline that requires fact-finding and critical thinking. Students in IR are required to write, present, and defend a thesis paper. International Relations is open to Global Scholars students only. IR is a lecture-based course with one social science lab per rotation.
1 credit, full-year.  Prerequisite: Global Scholars students.  Serves as a capstone experience for the Global Scholar and Business and Finance Fellow designations.


Contemporary American Politics and Society (Honors option)

Contemporary American Politics and Society (CAPS) uses American studies techniques to explore the United States since 1945.  In addition to history textbooks, it employs fiction, film, television, and art to document the ways American politics and society have evolved between the Truman and Obama administrations.  The course pays special attention to minorities and mass movements, including the great migration of poor Southerners, the civil rights and anti-Vietnam movements, and feminism, as well as opposition to them.  It covers political changes including the “Republican ascendancy” between 1968 and 2009 and the vital role of media in championing or denigrating candidates.  The course may be taken for regular credit or as an Honors course by writing a comprehensive research thesis. 
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: U.S. History or AP U.S. History.  Honors course serves as a capstone experience for the Global Scholar and Business and Finance Fellow designations.


WORLD LANGUAGES

The main goals of the World Language Department are to give the students superb preparation for college and to prepare them for life in the 21st century, when speaking foreign languages is important for their living and functioning in a global society.  The awareness of cultural diversity and the heightened sensitivity to similarities and differences enrich future language studies, careers, and travel opportunities.  We strive to stimulate thinking and reasoning through absorbing the sense of order and logic inherent in the language and transferring it to knowledge of any type.  The World Language Department is inclusive; it believes that everyone can be taught to function in our increasingly demanding society.  Our students should not be afraid to speak, perform, lead or interact.  We emphasize communication from the 5th grade to the 5th  year.  The language comes alive in the classroom as teachers use it completely and expect the same of the students.  Creativity spans from "real- life" situations dramatized in the more elementary classes to abstract discussions concerning contemporary issues and literary themes in the advanced courses.  The philosophy is consistently reflected in the four languages taught: French, Spanish, Latin and Chinese.  The department teaches students to think, communicate, and lead while keeping open minds of tolerance and acceptance of others.


FRENCH


French 1

This course offers an introduction to the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French. The course objective is the acquisition of beginning communication skills, both oral and written. Vocabulary is conversational, current, and useful. The course covers basic grammatical structures and verb tenses (présent, passé composé and future), and students learn to communicate orally in French early in their language study. French culture is part of each lesson. Materials include one text, Bien Dit! Level 1, and the accompanying workbooks, as well as films, videos, and audio CDs. Evaluation is frequent and varied, by means of quizzes, tests, oral comprehension, oral presentations, and daily assignments.
1 credit, full-year


French 2

This course continues to develop oral skills and grammatical principles by means of selected readings in dialogue form and various grammar exercises. Students will advance their skills in speaking, reading, listening, and writing French. Course materials include one text, Bien Dit! Level 2 and the accompanying workbooks, in addition to assorted outside readings and films. Evaluation is based on oral work in class and written tasks including homework, tests, quizzes, and compositions.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: French 1


French 3

This course presents a concentrated review of grammar and an introduction to contemporary language subtleties, including readings in French literature as well as various aspects of French culture. Course objectives are increased proficiency and spontaneity in both written and oral communications and the understanding of some of the basic tenets of French civilization. Materials include the text Bien Dit! Level 3 and the accompanying workbooks, in addition to assorted outside readings, such as Le Petit Prince by St Exupéry. Evaluation of progress is based on frequent quizzes, tests, compositions, quality of classroom participation, and oral presentations.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: French 2


French 3 Honors

This course presents a concentrated review of grammar and an introduction to contemporary language subtleties, including readings in French literature as well as various aspects of French culture at a quicker pace. Course objectives are increased proficiency and spontaneity in both written and oral communications and the understanding of some of the basic tenets of French civilization. Materials include the text Bien Dit! Level 3 and the accompanying workbooks, in addition to preliminary work on important literary figures and an in-depth study of Le Petit Princeby St Exupéry. Evaluation of progress is based on frequent quizzes, tests, compositions, quality of classroom participation, and oral presentations.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: French 2 , departmental approval.


French 4

This course is designed for intermediate students who have completed Level 3. The primary goal of the course is to enable students to develop their communication skills. Nevertheless, the focus remains on the continued development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Students will review and refine their understanding of the structures of the language. They will also broaden their vocabulary repertoire. Course materials include Bravo! and selected readings, such as Le Petit Nicolas, by Goscinny and Sempé. Some movies also will be used as part of the curriculum. Grade will be based on oral and written performance, aural comprehension, presentations, tests, and quizzes.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: French 3 or French 3 Honors


Modern French Authors Honors

The emphasis of Modern French Authors Honors is primarily on linguistic competence.  Accuracy and self-expression in creative writing are stressed.  Students are expected to perform at an advanced level both orally and in written compositions.  Grammar is reviewed.  Formal literary analysis is introduced through a variety of literary texts.  Preparation for the SAT Subject Test is conducted in the spring using the College Board Achievement Test booklet and microcomputer software.  Course materials will be selected from the following authors:  Anouilh, Sartre, Pagnol, and Francophone writers (Canada, Senegal, Morocco, etc.).  Students are evaluated through quizzes, tests, aural comprehension, oral participation, reports, written compositions, and individual projects. 
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: French 3, French 3 Honors, or departmental approval.


AP French Language and Culture 

French Language and Culture is a full-year course offered to students having successfully completed the full-year Modern French Authors Honors course. It emphasizes extensively the use of language for active and authentic communication to understand spoken and written French in various contexts, as well as to express oneself with fluency, orally and in writing. The acquisition of advanced proficiency in each of the three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretive and presentational) constitutes the main learning objective of the course. To attain this goal, students will explore facets of the following six themes: Global Challenges, Science and Technology, Contemporary Life, Personal and Public Identities, Families and Communities, and Beauty and Aesthetics. Evaluation will be frequent and varied, based on oral and written performance, aural comprehension, reports, tests and quizzes, and compositions. 
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Modern French Authors Honors or departmental approval


Post-AP French Honors

This Honors college-level course is designed for students who have successfully completed the AP year and taken the AP examination. It will be taught as a seminar in French, where students do extensive reading on their own and come to class prepared to engage in discussions. Texts span from 17th to 21stcentury novels and plays. Five major works will be read and discussed during the year. Classes will meet three periods per cycle. Evaluation will be based on class participation, daily written preparation, reports, papers, quizzes and tests. 
l credit, full-year. Prerequisite: AP French Language and Culture


The following French courses are offered every other year:

French Speaking World 5/6 (Le monde francophone)

This course is for students who would like to further enhance their proficiency in French language and literature. Reading excerpts from various writers of the French-speaking world will lead to analysis and discussion of the texts. Through the study of tales, short stories, novels, and poetry, students will expand their vocabulary and review grammar. Movies and cultural units also will be included.

Important grammatical concepts also will be reviewed. Considerable emphasis will be placed on interactive communication. Grade will be based on class discussions, oral presentations, papers, and tests.
1 credit, full-year, offered 2014-2015. Prerequisite: French 4, Modern French Authors Honors or French Regions 5/6


French Regions 5/6 (A la découverte des régions de France)

This course is designed to promote students’ awareness of French geography, history, arts and literature. Traveling to different French regions via selected videos and writings will enhance their understanding and appreciation of French culture. Students will advance linguistically through an active study and review of grammar and vocabulary. By reading and studying a variety of French literary works, they also will further develop their language skills. Evaluation will be based on oral and written performance, such as quizzes, tests, and oral presentations.
1 credit, full-year, offered 2015-2016. Prerequisite: French 4, Modern French Authors Honors or The French Speaking World 5/6


SPANISH

Spanish 1

This course is an introduction to the basics of speaking, writing, reading and oral comprehension of the Spanish language through visual, oral, and auditory stimuli.  The course covers indispensable verb tenses for communication, such as present and future, as well as basic grammar concepts.  Vocabulary is extensive, practical and conversational.  This course aims to equip the student with the skills needed for communicating in a foreign language and they will be encouraged to use them early in their study.  Hispanic culture is part of each lesson. Students are evaluated by means of quizzes, tests, class participation, and daily assignments.
1 credit, full-year


Spanish 2

This course continues to develop the skills introduced in Spanish 1.  More complex language patterns and grammatical structures are introduced, and additional verb tenses and basic idioms are taught.  Students become familiar with Hispanic culture through readings and class discussions.  Students are evaluated in writing through quizzes, tests and short compositions, and orally by class participation and student-written skits or dialogues.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Spanish 1


Spanish 3

This course is concerned with reinforcing existing language patterns and with teaching more advanced structures.  Students are consistently afforded the opportunity to practice their speaking and listening skills within a safe classroom setting while honing their writing and developing effective reading skills.  Emphasis is placed on various elements of Hispanic culture, such as history, customs and etiquette.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Spanish 2


Spanish 3 Honors

This course is concerned with reinforcing existing language patterns and with teaching more advanced structures at a quicker pace and in a more comprehensive way.  Students are consistently afforded the opportunity to practice their speaking and listening skills within a safe classroom setting while honing their writing and developing effective reading skills.  Emphasis is placed on various elements of Hispanic culture, such as history, customs and etiquette, as well as preliminary work on important literary figures and themes.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Spanish 2, departmental approval


Spanish 4 

Through the use of authentic texts, film and music, students experience an overview of the geography, history, food and customs of Spain and Mexico while encountering other cultural aspects specific to regions within those two countries.  Students also review and enhance their understanding of various grammatical structures and concepts.  The focus of the course remains on broadening speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as enriching vocabulary.  Evaluation is varied and frequent, based on oral and written samples, tests, quizzes, and participation in class discussions.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Spanish 3, 3H or departmental approval


Spanish Language & Culture Honors (formerly Modern Hispanic Authors Honors)

This course is designed for students who have developed a high degree of proficiency in the Spanish language and want to continue to improve and expand their reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills.  The textbook, Revista, offers short films, stories, articles, and other forms of writing about relevant cultural differences and current issues.  After reading and reflecting, students are asked to analyze, debate, and present on topics such as personality differences, censorship and differences in political leadership.  Each semester, students study and debate a current economic or social issue of a Spanish-speaking country and propose solutions to address the issue.  This course offers in-depth study of the most challenging grammar concepts and a review of those already learned in previous years.  A major goal of this course is to prepare students for enrollment in the subsequent Advanced Placement course.  Evaluation is varied and frequent and is based on oral and written performances on tests, quizzes and participation in class discussions.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Spanish 3, Spanish 3 Honors or departmental approval


Spanish 5/6-North America

Students will explore the geography, history, food and customs of Central America, the Caribbean and the Latino culture of the United States while investigating other cultural aspects specific to these communities.  Students will also review some of the more challenging grammatical concepts in addition to enhancing their speaking and writing with more advanced structures.  The focus of the course continues to be broadening speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as enriching vocabulary.  Evaluation is varied and frequent and is based on oral and wrriten samples, tests, quizzes, small projects and participation in class discussions.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Spanish 4, Modern Hispanic Authors Honors or departmental approval                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

Spanish 5/6-South America

Students will explore the geography, history, food and customs of Sout America while investigating other cultural aspects specific to regions within that continent.  Students will also review some of the more challenging grammatical concepts in addition to enhancing their speaking and writing with more advanced structures.  The focus of the course continues to be broadening speaking, listening, reading and writing skills as well as enriching vocabulary.  Evaluation is varied and frequent and is based on oral and wrriten samples, tests, quizzes, small projects and participation in class discussions.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Spanish 4, Modern Hispanic Authors Honors or departmental approval                 


AP Spanish Language and Culture

The goal of this course is to polish and perfect the Spanish language skills in order to prepare the students to take the AP Spanish exam. It emphasizes extensively the use of language for active and authentic communication to understand spoken and written Spanish in various contexts, as well as to express oneself with fluency orally and in writing. The acquisition of advanced proficiency in each of the three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretive and presentational) constitutes the main learning objective of the course. The grade for this course will come from daily oral contributions, major papers, and examinations based on vocabulary and content of works read as well as grammar.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Modern Hispanic Authors Honors or departmental approval


Post-AP Spanish Honors

Post-AP Spanish Honors is a college-level honors course available to students who have completed AP Spanish and have taken the examination. Its content rotates from year to year, but revolves around prominent literature in the canons of Spain and Latin America.  Possible authors will include:  Federico García Lorca, Horacio Quiroga, Isabel Allende, as well as many others important to a broad understanding of Hispanic literature.   This class is taught in a seminar style and meets three times per cycle. The grade will be based on informal reading reports, presentations, essays, and class participation.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: AP Spanish Language and Culture



LATIN

Latin 1

Latin 1 introduces students to the language and culture of the ancient Romans. The translation of Latin into English is the primary course objective, with emphasis placed on the acquisition of basic vocabulary and grammar. Vocabulary study deals frequently with the connections between Latin and English, allowing students to augment their English capabilities significantly. In addition to language study, Latin I students encounter various elements of the ancient Roman world, including mythology, history, and daily life.
1 credit, full-year


Latin 2

Latin 2 continues the development of grammar, vocabulary, and culture undertaken in Latin I. Students encounter more complicated elements of the language, including the subjunctive mood, and develop their ability to synthesize previously acquired grammar and vocabulary information when approaching translations. Students also continue studying elements of ancient Roman life, with a particular emphasis on mythology. 
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Latin 1


Latin 3

Latin 3 is designed to complete students’ study of Latin grammar and allow them to begin reading works of Latin literature in their original form. Students begin by translating adapted passages and progress to authentic passages from prose authors such as Caesar, Cicero, and Pliny. Ancient Roman history, mythology, and culture are examined through the content of these works.  
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Latin 2


Latin 3 Honors

The primary emphasis of Latin 3 Honors is the reading of authentic Latin texts. Having completed their study of grammar, students translate directly from primary sources composed by authors of both poetry and prose, including Caesar, Cicero, Pliny, Ovid, and Catullus. Ancient Roman history, mythology, and culture are examined through the content of these works. A major goal of this course is to prepare students for enrollment in the subsequent Advanced Placement course.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Latin 2 or departmental approval

Latin 4

Latin 4 continues allowing students to encounter the world of the ancient Romans by translating primary sources. While Latin 3 emphasizes prose, Latin 4 emphasizes poetic works, particularly the Metamorphoses of Ovid. As before, students explore the history and culture of the ancient Romans through the content of the works they translate. 
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Latin 3 or departmental approval


Latin 4 Honors

Latin 4 Honors consists primarily of selections from the poets Vergil, Catullus, and Horace, with the flexibility to explore other works as guided by the interests of the class.  The course objectives are similar to those in AP Latin, although this course is less demanding in terms of pace and allows for a more broad survey of Latin literature.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Latin 3 or Latin 3 Honors and departmental approval

 

AP Latin

AP Latin consists of readings from Vergil’s Aeneid (poetry) and Julius Caesar’s Gallic War (prose). This rigorous course requires students not only to translate an extensive amount of Latin, but also to understand the historical context and literary value of these works, and to examine the rhetorical/poetic devices they utilize. An official course description as well as a full list of readings and other course requirements can be found at the College Board website (http://apcentral.collegeboard.com). 
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Latin 3 Honors and departmental approval


Post-AP Latin Honors

This course allows students who have successfully completed the AP course to continue developing their ability to translate and analyze authentic Latin literature, primarily the poetry of Catullus and Horace and the prose of Cicero. Like the AP Course, Post-AP requires students to work toward a mastery of scansion, rhetorical devices, historical context, and sight-reading in working with these texts. Throughout the year consideration is given to students’ particular interests in supplementing the course with English readings and additional Latin works.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: AP Latin or departmental approval



CHINESE

Chinese 1

This course will introduce students to Chinese sound systems (pinyin) and the Chinese writing system (traditional and simplified characters).  The teaching in Chinese will emphasize the development of basic conversational ability as well as reading and writing in Chinese.  The training will focus on distinguishing the four tones, methods of decoding vocabularies, and analyzing fundamental grammatical patterns.  Chinese customs, holidays, and history also will be introduced.
1 credit, full-year


Chinese 2

In the second year of Chinese, students will be introduced to more vocabulary, common expressions, and advanced sentence structures.  The students will learn how to describe daily life, write an invitation, go shopping, and count Chinese currency.  Also covered will be counting units for different objects, descriptions of the weather, and reading Chinese maps.  The cultural training will be continued through activities and projects.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Chinese 1


Chinese 3 Honors

This course continues building on the students’ previous Chinese knowledge by introducing new vocabulary, characters, grammar, and usage. It also aims at increased proficiency in comprehension, spoken production, reading, writing, typing, and translation skills. Through learning the language, the students also will have the opportunity to learn about daily life in China and to explore, discover, and develop an appreciation of Chinese arts, literature, business, and politics. The course will be taught in a highly interactive manner, with the goal of inspiring the students to discover the enjoyment of learning another language and exploring another culture.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Chinese 2


AP Chinese Language and Culture

The AP Chinese Language and Culture course is designed to provide qualified students with varied opportunities to further improve their proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese. Students also have maximum exposure to Chinese cultural elements that will be integrated into the process of learning the language. Through student-centered activities, they will develop skills that will allow them to comprehend, compare and contrast issues and ideas that are pertinent to their life and community. The rigor of the course and the range of content will prepare students for the Advanced Placement Chinese Language and Culture examination in May.
1 credit , full-year. Prerequisite : Chinese 3 Honors with departmental approval or Chinese 4 Honors


Chinese Language & Culture Honors

This Honors course is the equivalent of a year-long college/university Chinese curriculum and is designed for students who have successfully completed three years of Chinese study. It will examine the cinemas of the mainland, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Chinese Diaspora, with a focus on how the social, political, and cultural changes of contemporary China find their expression in films. Background readings will provide historical narratives; the selection of films and class discussions will center on key issues. Students will learn to use and analyze film language and develop a critical understanding of Chinese society and culture through film. The course will be conducted in Chinese, combining lecture, discussion, and students’ presentations.
1 credit , full–year. Prerequisite : Chinese 3 Honors


COMPUTER SCIENCE

In our computer-dominated society, it is vital that young women leave HB technologically literate.  The goal of the Computer Technology Department is to cultivate a community where technology is used to transform learning and where students are empowered to master the use of technology as an instrument for lifelong learning.  Students have daily access to desktop and notebook computers.  They learn essential computer and other technology skills for research and communication and they use the latest productivity software.  This hands-on experience is designed to enhance reasoning and problem-solving skills and promote the development of effective reading, writing and communication for the modern world.


Exploring Computer Science

Students will be introduced to the breadth of the field of computer science through a hands-on exploration of topics. Rather than focusing the entire course on learning particular software tools or programming languages, the course is designed to focus the conceptual ideas of computing and help students understand why certain tools or languages might be utilized to solve particular problems. The goal is to develop in students the computational thinking practices of algorithm development, problem solving, and programming within the context of problems that are relevant to the lives of today’s students. Students will also be introduced to topics such as interface design, limits of computers and societal and ethical issues. Evaluation will be based on participation, projects, and quizzes.
½ credit, full-year.


AP Computer Science

Students will build upon their programming skills, focusing on object-oriented programming using the Java programming language. The course will prepare students for the AP Computer Science A exam. Students will reinforce concepts learned in Intro to Computer Science and begin the study of advanced data structures and algorithm analysis. Evaluation will be based on participation, projects, quizzes, and tests. This course is recommended for all students interested in pursuing engineering.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Exploring Computer Science (formerly Introduction to Computer Science) or departmental approval


Post-AP Computer Science Honors

Students will pursue advanced topics in computer science. An emphasis will be placed on developing a capstone project. Examples of potential focal points include learning a new programming language, contributing to an existing open-source project, or developing software for use within the HB community. This course is recommended for students interested in further studies of computer science and programming.
½ credit, full-year. Prerequisite: AP Computer Science or departmental approval


VISUAL ARTS

The Visual Arts Department at Hathaway Brown embraces the school’s philosophy of “learning for life.” The department is committed to promoting technical and creative growth in a variety of media to students in all courses. Through our unified departmental vision and teamwork, our philosophy is to create in each student age-appropriate technical skills, the ability to conceive and execute works of art in both two and three dimensions, and to develop their personal confidence and artistic vision. The Visual Arts Department encourages problem-solving skills at all grade levels. Assignments are sequential and cumulative, as we vertically integrate the content of our curriculum, allowing students to develop their artistic vocabulary, technical skills, creative thinking, critical-thinking skills, and independent work habits. At the same time, we encourage students to push themselves to expand their vision and stretch their minds to adapt to the demands of the 21st century.

Studio Art Survey

The Studio Art Survey class is an introductory survey course for the Upper School that lays the groundwork for students to develop their abilities in the visual arts. Students work on developing skills in drawing and design principles through the use of a variety of media, learning the essential qualities of each one.  The class examines work and ideas from the history of art and relates these to class projects. Students explore the artistic process and develop problem-solving skills through experimentation with new ideas and new media.  The sequence of projects is organized so that students use and build upon the acquired skills of the prior completed assignments.  Students view and critique each other's work in order to increase visual awareness and develop aesthetic understanding and vocabulary. The course includes work in the following media: pencil, charcoal, pastels, oil pastels, printmaking, acrylic paints, ink, ceramics, and mixed media.  These efforts lead to increased personal creativity and expression, self-reliance and greater understanding of the meaning of art in our lives and society.
½ credit, full-year


Two-Dimensional Media

Two-Dimensional Media is an advanced course in the Upper School art curriculum and is a continuation of the exploration of ideas and two-dimensional techniques introduced in the Studio Art Survey course.  The class includes in-depth studies in drawing, printmaking, and painting, with an emphasis on design and composition, We’ll also survey the work and ideas from the history of art and contemporary artists.  The artistic process is explored through projects based on a series of approaches. This allows students to develop greater problem-solving skills through experimentation with a variety of ideas and media.  Students will learn how to use techniques particular to these media for greater personal expression.  The course includes work in the following media: pencil, charcoal, pastels, oil pastels, colored pencils, watercolor paints, printmaking, acrylic paints, ink, and mixed media.  Participants view and critique each other's work in order to increase visual awareness and develop aesthetic understanding and vocabulary. Students work on projects based on the skills they have mastered to show their own personal approach. These efforts lead to increased personal creativity and expression, self-reliance and greater understanding of the meaning of art in our lives and society.
½ credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Studio Art Survey or departmental approval


Ceramics and Sculpture 1, 2, 3

Ceramics and Sculpture is an advanced course for Upper School students interested in working in three dimensions.  This class builds upon the design and art ideas that students already have worked with in the Studio Art Survey course and expands these ideas into the three-dimensional world.  Students work on reliefs and sculpture in the round, and examine work and ideas from the history of art and contemporary artists.  Participants explore the artistic process and develop problem-solving skills through experimentation with new ideas and new media.  Students will view and critique each other's work in order to increase visual awareness and develop aesthetic understanding and vocabulary.  There are assignments in various media in order to explore spatial concepts and work in a variety of methods to form sculpture, including modeling, construction, carving, and molding.  New projects are assigned each year so that advanced students have new challenges. These efforts leads to increased personal creativity and expression, self-reliance and greater understanding of the meaning of art in our lives and society.
½ credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Studio Art Survey or departmental approval


Publication Design

This course is designed to teach students basic publishing skills on the computer while creating the school’s yearbook. Skill areas to be mastered include: Adobe and InDesign desktop publishing programs, Photoshop image manipulation, basic graphic design and layout skills, photography with a digital camera, scanning photos into the computer, cropping and placing digital and conventional pictures, storing pages to the proper files, and submitting pages. Students will learn how to prepare files for the commercial printer, as well as the business planning skills needed to successfully sell and distribute the yearbooks.
½ credit, full-year. Prerequisite: departmental approval


Photo 1

Photo 1 is a full-year introductory course. The content of this class is solely traditional black-and-white photography, introducing students to camera operations, darkroom procedures, and the creative aspects of photography. Students learn technical camera operations: light metering, f-stop/shutter speed, and camera functions. In the darkroom, students are required to learn and use all darkroom technical processes and equipment.  Outside the darkroom, students learn final print presentation including cropping and mounting of final prints. Over the course of the year, students also learn the aesthetics of photography: design, composition, narrative and content. This is accomplished through individual instruction, interpretive assignments, and class and individual critiques. Students also learn the history of photography though exposure to the work of various masters of the medium. Most assignments are given in simple prompts, allowing students to think independently, with the goal that they will learn creative interpretation and develop their personal inventive approach to resolving each assignment. Students also are encouraged to shoot independent photos on each roll of film, outside the assignment, to develop their individual eye for ideas and design.
½ credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Studio Art Survey or departmental approval; open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.


Photo 2

Photo 2 is a full-year course that stresses the finer points of the medium. During the first semester of Photo 2, the students will be asked to define their technical skills, develop their ability to judge and analyze data, and control the image-making process so that their photographs are unique and self-expressive. Experimentation and exploration into new areas will play a larger role in the first semester of this course. The second semester of Photo 2 will be devoted to developing the students’ unique photographic styles while maintaining technical excellence in their work. The students will be asked to pursue areas of interest in depth, leading to the creation of some meaningful and powerful work.
½ credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Photo 1 or departmental approval


Photo 3

Photo 3 is an advanced photography course that asks students not only to continue to produce technically excellent work, but also to stretch their creative capacities. In Photo 3 the students enter real-world scenarios for professional photographers, including tighter deadlines, team projects, and exploring more deeply into the areas of studio and digital work that professionals encounter on a daily basis. Students are expected to work with independence and develop the ability to critique each other’s work.
½ credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Photo 2 and departmental approval


Advanced Studio Art Honors

This course, open to juniors and seniors, can be taken for one or two years. We explore advanced methods and media in 2-D, with emphasis on developing each student’s individual abilities. Much of the class is geared toward refining drawing, painting, and design skills through the completion of various observational academic assignments in still life, figure study, design, landscape, and interior space. Second-year students are encouraged to create their own goals for the year, through both assigned work and a long-term independent project in the second semester. Selected second-year students also have the option of creating Advanced Placement portfolios for submission to the College Board for possible college credit.
1 credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Studio Art Survey and Ceramics and Sculpture and/or Two-Dimensional Media and departmental approval


PERFORMING ARTS

Theatre | Dance | Music

THEATRE

The philosophy of the Performing Arts Department is to nurture creativity in girls and instill a passion for excellence in music, dance, and theatre. The vertical integration of each discipline empowers girls at every stage of development to achieve her personal artistic potential so that she has the skills to successfully pursue the arts in the collegiate or professional arena. The Performing Arts curriculum enables our students to build a life-long relationship with the arts.

We guide our students to be actively engaged in the creative process. This encourages taking artistic risks, fostering respect, resiliency, and strengthening the individual and collaborative voice. Through the balanced development of kinesthetic skill, cognitive understanding, and aesthetic awareness, our students build a creative intelligence that is spontaneous, transformative, and resilient. We strive to provide an arts program that is on the cutting edge of expression, finding new ways to reflect our changing times and the growth journey of young women. Our faculty provides opportunities for our students to explore the artistic cultures of our world, making connections beyond our borders

Our primary role as arts educators is to empower personal artistry in our students. In turn, our students become a creative community who learn to respect each other’s personal uniqueness and their contribution to the artistic whole. As ensemble artists, they become an integral part of the legacy at Hathaway Brown and the community at large. We believe in the power of the arts to change a heart, connect a community, bring meaning to life, and be an agent of change.


Acting 

For all students, with or without experience on the stage, the goal of Acting is to provide a knowledge base of all aspects of the theatre—performance, improvisation, theatre games, stage directions, acting techniques, costumes, basics of technical theatre (lighting, set, sound), theatre history, use of voice and body.  Students will take field trips to several productions in the area during the year. The year will culminate in a presentation of skills learned.  For students who have experience (from the Middle School program or other programs), the course will enlarge their sense of the whole, sharpen their skills, and challenge them in areas not covered by their previous experiences.  Every student interested in the theatre program will be required to enroll in this course in order to take other courses.
½ credit, full-year.


Improvisation

This course is designed to develop spontaneity in the actor.  Using the skills acquired in Acting, the student will explore the human condition from a humorous perspective by creating situations, characters, movement, and dialogue on their feet.  Each will create her own fictional character.  We will focus on the body, proper alignment, flexibility, and relaxation to inform character choices.  Masks will be used to further enhance movement, and the Commedia dell’Arte form will be used as a springboard for scenarios, character development, and for playing comedy.  This course may be taken multiple times. 
½ credit, full-year; Prerequisite (only applies to freshmen):  Acting


Black Box Ensemble

This course is designed for the advanced student.  In order to further illuminate the sense of the individual actor within the group—as the character within the play—we will use an ensemble approach to develop the specific tools needed to create individual skills within the group.  Students will workshop and perform scenes and monologues using Chekhov, Stansilavski, Hagen, and Meisner techniques.  Exercises and improv games will be based on these techniques.  Scene and character analysis will be explored on a more advanced level than in the Acting course.  Directing will be a large component of BBE—each member will direct a student-written play in the Student Playwriting Festival.  Field trips to productions in the area, and a performance in the Black Box will occur during the year.  This course may be taken more than once. 
1 credit, full-year.  Prerequisite:  Acting or by invitation only (student may be asked to audition).


Black Box Ensemble Honors

BBE Honors is offered to seniors only.  This course is taken with the regular BBE class, though additional requirements are added.  The student will continue to pursue the development of her acting skills by participating in all of the activities, but also will increase her knowledge and experience by performing in a special one-act or one-woman show as a culmination of her studies.  She also will create a portfolio of her works on DVD, construct a résumé, and produce a head shot—a professional package for college applications or the professional world.
1 credit, full-year.  Prerequisite: by invitation only (student may be asked to audition).


Technical Theatre

Students learn various production skills through hands-on participation in the technical aspects of theatre, including set construction, painting, lighting, sound and video. Students should anticipate some after-school time commitments. Open to all students.
½  credit, full-year


Advanced Technical Theatre

Students having completed Technical Theatre have the opportunity to expand their understanding of theatrical technology by focusing on a design discipline of their choice. Students may experiment with techniques of lighting, sound or scenic design. Taking class time to create their own original design projects will give each student the ability to look at her chosen discipline and see how the technical translates into a work of art. Seeing projects through the designer’s eye awakens creativity in all aspects of everyday tasks.
½  credit, full-year. Prerequisite: Technical Theatre


After-School Productions

Two main-stage productions will be presented each year.  These productions are open to all students by audition.

The Annual Student Playwriting Festival invites all students to submit scripts, as well as perform in the plays.


DANCE

Contemporary Dance Technique

Contemporary Dance Technique is a course open to all students regardless of experience.  This course provides a fun introduction to the world of dance.  Students will experience different types of dance within an inclusive environment.  This will include the history of dance as an art form which will be unveiled through video observations and class discussions.  Throughout the course, students will explore dance through movement classes that cover ballet, contemporary, and jazz techniques.  Each student will be encouraged to work toward the goal of understanding her body as a physical instrument and to identify personal goals in order to grow in movement development.  This course aims to provide the student with an awarenes of aesthetics,  the creative process, and the many benefit dance has to offer!
½ credit, full-year.


The Art of Choreography

This course is a two-part, full-credit course that encourages serious dance students to assume more responsibility for producing their own work. Part one will explore the various craft elements associated with choreography through structured improvisations, critique writing, video analysis, and journaling designed to hone creative skills as well as significantly broaden the dancer’s movement vocabulary. With an emphasis on exploring their own choreographic style, these students will be encouraged to present work in the February Dance Concert. Part two involves the design and presentation of an independent research project in the spring, focusing on a significant 20th century modern dance choreographer. 
½ credit, full-year.  Prerequisite: Contemporary Dance Technique


Contemporary Dance Ensemble

Contemporary Dance Ensemble is a full-credit course that encourages serious dance students to assume more responsibility for producing their work. In addition to broadening their knowledge base of Bartenieff fundamentals and Laban principles, students also will have an in-depth, hands-on working experience with the various design elements associated with dance production, such as lighting, costume, sound, and video design. Through structured improvisations, students also will be encouraged to find their own choreographic voice.
1 credit, full-year. By audition/invitation only.


Contemporary Dance Ensemble Honors

Contemporary Dance Ensemble Honors is an Honors course that encourages serious dance students to assume more responsibility for producing their own work. In addition to broadening their knowledge base of Bartenieff fundamentals, Laban principles, and the design elements associated with dance production, students also will be required to fulfill a dance related community service and civic engagement component. Community service involvement includes, but is not limited to, collaborating with different organizations to produce events, performing arts, related volunteer work at a festival, or essentially engaging a targeted population in an arts-related experience. Civic engagement involvement includes, but is not limited to, being a member of a professional organization, or performing for a population outside the HB community. In addition, Honors students are responsible for writing a résumé, designing a dance portfolio, and creating a new work for the dance concert.
1 credit, full-year. By audition/invitation only.


After-School Dance Program

Students may select to be a part of the after-school dance program which takes place Monday-Thursday 3:30-5 p.m. for arts credit.

For Arts Credit:  Student may commit to two classes per week for one trimester for ¼ arts credit or students may commit to four classes per week for one trimester for ½ arts credit.
Trimesters. Pass/Fail

Monday/Wednesday3:30-5 p.m.Ballet
Tuesday/Thursday3:30-5 p.m.Modern

MUSIC

Solo Vocal Music

In this class we will explore a singer’s performance with songs in various styles of contemporary music, music for theatre, and original work, emphasizing communication with the audience, working with an accompanist or band, song arranging and material selection. Dynamics of vocal interpretation and style will also be examined.  This class meets once a week on Thursdays from 3:20-5:00 PM in the Upper School Choral Room.  Students will participate on a pass/fail basis where attendance and performance will account for a large majority of the grade.
1/4 credit, second semester, pass/fail. 

HB Singers

HB Singers is open to all students who love to sing and want an ensemble experience. Students will learn fundamentals of singing, music literacy, and choral expression as they perform excellent women’s choir literature from various time periods and cultures. Sight-reading, solfege, and basic music theory also are a part of the course. Solo and small ensemble opportunities are available to interested students. Performances include winter and spring concerts and school assemblies. HB Singers meets three times a six-day cycle during X block.
½ credit, full-year.


The Bravuras

Bravuras is a small, select ensemble of sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Bravuras perform advanced a cappella women's choir repertoire from a variety of time periods, world traditions, and modern genres such as pop and vocal jazz. Attention is given to sophisticated vocal techniques, aural skills, blend and balance, artistry, and stage presence. Performances include winter and spring concerts, school and community events, and adjudicated contests. Students in Bravuras are required to attend fall retreat and also must be part of HB Singers. Class meets three times per six-day cycle during X block, plus rehearsals outside of the school day.
½ credit, full-year. By audition only.

 

Music Theory for Singers

Music Theory is a subject that can be approached differently and specifically for singers.  Singers need extra reinforcement in music theory that is often mandatory for instrumentalists.  This course focuses on interval singing, sight singing, solfege and harmony through games, small group work and individual practice.  Music Theory for Singers will give singers confidence in their abilities to read music in large group settings or by themselves without the use of an accompanist.
1/8 credit, full-year, pass/fail.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     
          

Songwriting

This course involves students working in a lab environment to create and record songs of their own. Students will learn basic melodic and harmonic funtion critical to song structure as well as lyrical structure.  Class members will present and perform songs for one another and learn how to give critical feedback.  Although there is no prerequisite course, students must posses basic knowledge of music theory (basic note and rhythmic reading) and basic profiency on a harmonic instrument (piano or guitar).
1/4 credit, full-year, pass/fail.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      
                                                                                                                            

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Music Theory

Music Theory is designed for students interested in broadening their understanding of the fundamentals of music. Students will learn symbols of the score, musical terms, pitch identification and notation in multiple clefs, rhythmic durations, meter, and major and minor keys. To build a solid foundation for understanding tonal harmony, students will explore scales, intervals, chord qualities and inversions, diatonic chords, and chord progressions. Foundational work eventually will lead to four-part writing, arranging, and original composition.  Basic functions in Sibelius music notation software will be practiced throughout the year as projects are assigned.  Material will be learned through lecture and discussion, written work, basic keyboarding, dictation, and sight-singing.  There is no prerequisite for Music Theory, but instrumental and/or vocal competency is a must.
¼ credit, full-year


Advanced Music Theory Honors

This course is designed to help students develop an understanding of the materials and process of music. The course includes the knowledge necessary to successfully complete the AP Central course requirements fo music theory including music composition, solfege, dictation, four part analysis and composition.  Scales, modes rhythmic notation and both simple and compound meters and the useage thereof will be examined.  
1/2 credit, full-year.  Prerequisite: Music Theory or placement test and an intermediate performance level on any instrument including the ability to play all major and minor scales.


Orchestra

The Hathaway Brown Orchestra is open to all students who play an orchestral instrument.  The orchestra provides students with an opportunity to expand their instrumental skills through rehearsal and performance of quality literature in both the full orchestra and small chamber ensembles.  The orchestra presents a minimum of two major concerts each year, and small ensembles perform at school events throughout the school year.   Orchestra will meet three times during X block in a six-day cycle.
½ credit, full-year


PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Physical Education is an exhilarating and vital part of the school day. It affords students the opportunity to energize the body and the brain with movement activities. Students will  develop leadership and problem solving skills, build community with classmates and gain a strong knowledge and practical foundation for lifelong physical health and wellness.

All students beginning 2013-2014 are required to take PE 100/101 as freshmen. Students can then choose to complete their requirement by taking Flex Fitness, fulfilling the PE Exemption requirements,  or completing Alternative PE criteria.


PE 100/101

PE 100/101 is required for all freshmen.  In this course, students will engage in Adventure Learning, Fitness,  Lifetime Activities, and Swimming. The Adventure Learning curriculum stresses problem solving, team /community building, leadership and communication skills through ground, low and high element climbing activities. The fitness curriculum focuses on developing skills and knowledge necessary to manage personal fitness programs. It includes applying the primary components and principles of  fitness  when engaging in class activities such as  fitness room workouts, Yoga, Pilates, and Zumba.  The Lifetime Activities curriculum involves students in recreational activities that encourage healthy lifestyles.  Racquet sports, ultimate games and backyard games will be included.   A swim test will be conducted  to determine the safety and competence of the student when in the water. All students are required to pass the swim test.  A quarter of swimming will be included in a student’s PE 100/101 course if they do not pass the swim test.
0.20 credit, full-year, 9th grade requirement


Flex Fitness

Flex Fitness is designed to develop a Fitness program that is flexible and manageable. Programs are developed on an individual basis to meet the needs of the students. Students develop goals and work toward those goals throughout the year by planning workouts in the Fitness Room, attending HB fitness classes, and participating in approved  non-school related fitness activities. Students are responsible for managing their program by incorporating heart rate monitors, completing fitness logs, attending periodic conferences with their Flex Fitness supervisor, and completing end of the semester assignments. 
0.15 credit, semester-long. Available to sophomores, juniors and seniors. 


PE Athletics Exemption

Students may choose this option after their freshman year if they have completed at least one season of Upper School athletics. Students must complete the “ intent to participate” section on their scheduling sheet indicating which sport they will participate in.  A student will complete their PE requirement with the exemption when they have completed 2 full seasons of athletics. 


Alternative PE

To be considered for Alternative PE, a student athlete should be competing at the regional and/or national level in events sanctioned by the National Governing body for that sport. The Student athlete must be involved in intensive training outside of school that typically involves a minimum of 3 hours per day. The student athlete is responsible for securing, completing, and turning in all necessary paperwork to the Physical Education Department.  An application must be completed prior to the year of requested eligibility. For more information or for an application, please see the Physical Education Department Chair.
0.15 credit, semester-long. Available to sophomores, juniors and seniors.  


HEALTH

Completion of the Health courses will satisfy the HB requirement and the State of Ohio Health Education requirement.


Wellness 9-12

Wellness is designed to prepare students to better understand their own health choices.  In discussions highlighting important issues and incorporating current research, students discover the implications of choices made, not only on a day-to-day basis, but also with potential lifetime benefits and consequences.  Students are encouraged to appraise the effect of their own value systems on their lifestyles.  Topics include nutrition and healthy eating patterns, substance abuse prevention, stress management,  human sexuality, and financial literacy.  The underlying theme that our lives are affected by the quality of our interaction with others forms the basis for exploring each of these areas.


Wellness 9:

1/6 credit, full-year
9th grade requirement


Wellness 10:

1/6 credit, full-year
10th  grade requirement


Wellness 11:

1/12 credit, fall semester
11th grade requirement


Wellness 12:

1/12 credit, spring semester
12th grade requirement


INSTITUTE FOR 21ST CENTURY EDUCATION

The Institute for 21st Century Education is a collection of opportunities. It’s a solar system of possibilities. It’s a new way of thinking about the kind of high school that students need so they can be prepared for success in college and in tomorrow’s world.

At its most basic level, the Institute is an assortment of programs that Upper School students can join if they so choose.  Sometimes the Institute is a room.  Sometimes it’s a class. It’s always voluntary, and it always aims to unleash a student’s creativity, imagination and passion.

Five of the Institute’s nine centers provide opportunities for students to attain designations upon graduation. Students interested in these opportunities should speak with the directors to learn more about the program. It’s very important to understand, though, that the Institute is a platform for pursuing passions rather than a system for allocating rewards. We encourage students to explore, experiment and participate in centers whether or not they offer designations or whether or not a student wants to complete the necessary steps to achieving it. The designation is not the destination. The quality and passion invested are far more important than quantity of designations acquired. The designations are simply a way to illuminate a path and honor a student’s commitment to a cause or field of study. We encourage students to dabble, play and perhaps choose the center or centers that truly speak to what they care about and who they are.


SCIENCE RESEARCH & ENGINEERING PROGRAM

Science Research & Engineering Program (SREP)

Graduation Designation: The Science Research & Engineering allows students to graduate as Science Research and Engineering Scholars by following this path:

  • Register for and attend the Science Research & Engineering Seminar class beginning in grade 9 (preferable) or grade 10, through grade 12.
  • Procure, with the help of the Director of Research, a placement in a research lab at a location such as CWRU, Cleveland Clinic, or NASA Glenn, under the mentorship of a professional researcher
  • Grow into, conduct, and complete a multiyear research project at that lab, under the mentorship of a professional researcher
  • Document your original research in a formal technical report or thesis that meets rigorous Siemens and Intel entry qualifications by the required due date in August or September prior to senior year that is announced in class in the spring of junior year  Submit same into national or international competition.


Science Research & Engineering Seminar Class

This is a support class for the Science Research & Engineering Program.  Students must enroll in this Seminar class in order to join the SREP Program.  This class meets only once per week in one of the student’s free periods and therefore does not take the place of another class in the student’s schedule. In class, new students brainstorm with the Director of Research regarding what they want to do. Gradually, a topic is defined and a placement is found by either the family or the school.  Students who have their placements are supported by this class as they enter events such as the Siemens and Intel competitions. Also, students present their research to each other in class, as well as at an annual mandatory Poster Session & Reception event each March.  The class has no text and no tests, as it is a support class for the real work the students are doing, which is the research they are conducting in their labs.
½ credit, pass/fail, grades 9-12, departmental approval required.


THE CENTER FOR GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP

Graduation Designation: The Center for Global Citizenship offers The Global Scholars program, which is a four-year course of study. To receive the Global Scholars designation, students must successfully complete:

  • Global Scholars 1 (9th grade)
  • Two years of Global Scholars 2/3 (10th and 11th grades generally)
  • One capstone course (12th grade)
  • The defense of a thesis paper (12th grade)
  • Four years of a world language (9th-12th grades generally)
  • A comprehensive geography exam (spring of 12th grade)
  • At least one purposeful international experience (Anytime 9th-12th grades) 

Global Scholars 1

The promotion of global understanding and citizenship, the fostering of an appreciation for the cultures of the world, and an understanding of how the US fits into a global context are the focus of the first-year Global Scholars. During this foundational course, students will learn about who creates, shapes, and influences global policy and will become familiar with the different regions of the world (Latin America, Sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East).The course meets one period in each six-day cycle during X period and examines the historical, linguistic, geographic, political, economic, and cultural dimensions of a global education. Students will have short readings or response papers to complete for most class session and will be exposed to foreign film, world music, and multiple perspectives from around the world. This foundational class is a prerequisite for Global Scholars 2/3.
¼ credit, full-year. Open to freshmen, ungraded

Global Scholars 2/3

This elective is a requirement for any student participating in the Global Scholars Program. It uses the foundational knowledge of the world gained in Global Scholars 1. Global Scholars 2/3 is a lecture and discussion-based class that examines some of the most pressing issues and important regions of the day. Students will read scholarly articles from experts and gain an ability to discuss United States foreign policy and alternative options. Topics will include Islam in the Arab world, Turkey's challenges, food and climate, China's foreign policy, and Israel's relationship with the U.S. All sophomores must take World History. This course requires fact-finding and critical thinking. Global Scholars must continue their world language requirement of four years of one language. Global Scholars also will participate in some form of international experience before graduation.
¼ credit, full-year. Open to sophomores and juniors, ungraded. Prerequisite: Global Scholars 1.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
                                                                                    

 

THE CENTER FOR CIVIC ENGAGEMENT

Graduation Designation: The Center for Civic Engagement allows seniors to graduate as Service Learning Fellows by following this path:

  • Service Learning (9th or 10th grade)
  • Two years of Advanced Service Learning or Civic Leadership or one year of Campus and Community Sustainability and one year of Advanced Service Learning or Civic Leadership (10th-12th grades generally)
  • Capstone project (12th grade)

Service Learning (CBL)

Service Learning (community-based learning) is an elective that introduces students to Service Learning.  The in-class curriculum examines the history of Cleveland, current challenges in our community, and strategies for addressing these problems.  It features guest speakers and field trips to local organizations.  The off-campus component is comprised of a series of service projects addressing important needs in Greater Cleveland.  Students will have the opportunity to engage in hands-on service involving children, senior citizens, hunger, homelessness, and the environment.  This course is open to students in grades 9-12.
½ credit, full-year, pass/fail.


Advanced Service Learning (Advanced CBL)

Advanced Service Learning is a year-long Service Learning elective open to students in grades 10-12 who have taken Service Learning.  This course builds on the foundation established in Service Learning and focuses on contemporary challenges in the United States and specifically in Cleveland.  Through a rotating curriculum, students examine health care, public education, immigration and other pressing issues of our time.  Additionally, each student is placed in an ongoing hands-on service project of her choice.  This project must meet an actual community need.  The placement can occur after school, on weekends, or when possible during the school day.  It will take place off campus at a formal agency or organization, and students will work under the supervision of an employee or adult volunteer.
¼ credit, full-year, pass/fail. Prerequisite: Service Learning


Civic Leadership

Civic Leadership empowers students to become change agents in their community.  Students participate in field trips, meet with civic leaders, and explore the strengths and challenges of Cleveland neighborhoods.  As a culminating assignment, students develop solutions to pressing problems in our community.
¼ credit, full-year, pass/fail.  Fulfills participation in Service Learning elective.  Open to students in grades 10-12 who have completed at least one of these prerequisites: Service Learning; Advanced Service Learning; Leadership Seminar; Peer Education.


Campus & Community Sustainability

Enough talk about the sustainability challenges we face.   Let's do something about them, now!  This project-based class is for students who want to take action to help build a verdant, thriving future for our planet through projects on the HB campus and in the local community.  Students will have the opportunity to work on current projects within the Center for Sustainability.  Possible projects include: helping design and facilitate a school-wide climate education and action program (pending funding), helping to design and install a rain garden (pending funding and school approval), and expanding on-campus food production (pending school approval and funding).  Alternatively, students can bring their own project ideas focused on improving the sustainability of the school or local community and work on developing and implementing them during class time.
¼ credit per semester, semester or full-year option, pass/fail.  Fulfills participation in Service Learning elective.  



THE CENTER FOR BUSINESS AND FINANCE

Graduation Designation:  The Center for Business and Finance allows seniors to graduate as Business and Finance Scholars by following this path:

  • Business and Finance 1 (10th grade generally)
  • Business and Finance 2  (11th grade generally)
  • Honors capstone course (12th grade)
  • The defense of a thesis paper with an economics basis (12th grade)
       

Business and Finance 1

Business and Finance 1 is open to sophomores who want to participate in Junior Achievement’s Titan business simulation.  In Titan, students operate as CEOs of their own companies, managing six key business decisions: price of product, production levels, marketing expenses, research and development costs, capital investment level, and charitable giving.  Students also will be paired with a professional adult, female in a mentoring program.
1/4 credit, pass/fail.


Business and Finance 2

Business and Finance 2 is open to juniors who want to learn more about business school through the ”Business School in a Box” program.  Seven key business topics comprise the curriculum: leadership, finance, accounting, marketing, economics, strategy, and values.  Students also will either create an entrepreneurial enterprise or take part in an internship.  Working with Prime students on the Lemonade Day program rounds out the year.
1/4 credit, pass/fail.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

THE CENTER FOR TECHNOLOGY AND INVENTION
 

 Graduation Designation:  The Center for Technology and Invention allows seniors to graduate as Technology & Invention Fellow by following this path:

  • Complete at least two courses related to technology and/or invention. Options include Exploring Computer Science, AP Computer Science, Technical Theatre, or other courses with approval from the Director of the Center.
  • Participate over two years in one or more major projects through the Center. A major project is expected to require at least 40 hours of work on the part of the student, and requires approval from the Director of the Center to be classified as a “major project.”
  • Give an approved formal presentation of the project, e.g. a demonstration, slideshow, or poster session

 

THE OSBORNE WRITING CENTER

Graduation Designation: The Osborne Writing Center allows seniors to graduate as Writing Center Scholars or Fellows beginning in 2014-2015 by following this path:

To receive the Writing Scholar designation, students must successfully complete:

      • The Writing Community 1 (10th or 11th grade)
      • The Writing Community 2/3 (11th or 12th grade)
      • AP English Literature or Contemporary World Literature Honors
      • The defense of a thesis paper (12th grade)

To receive the Writing Fellow designation, students must successfully complete:

     • The Writing Community 1 (10th or 11th grade)
     • The Writing Community 2/3 (11th or 12th grade)
     • English 4 Creative Writing Honors
     • The defense of a substantial creative work in the genre of their choice (12th grade)

 

The Writing Community 1 (formerly The Writing Life)

The Writing Community 1 is open to sophomores who want to learn and practice the habits of a creative writer. Through creative practices and collaborations, students will gain a thorough orientation into what it means to be a writer and how to sustain creative practices. Students will read the work of visiting writers who will also conduct workshops and serve as mentors.
1/8 credit, pass/fail. 

 

The Writing Community 2/3

The Writing Community 2/3 is open to juniors and seniors who want to learn more about the theories and techniques behind writing and use them to help build a thriving writing culture. Students will develop and participate actively in Hathaway Brown's writing community by serving as peer writing assistants for ninth grade students, continuing to work with visiting writers, and also through developing and conducting creative writing workshops with middle school classes.
1/8 credit, pass/fail. 

 

THE CENTER FOR LEADERSHIP AND WELL-BEING

Leadership Seminar

In this course, student will be exposed to a variety of leadership styles, identify their own leadership values, improve communication skills, practice conflict management and learn the elements of successful team building.  As a practicum, students will participate in a group project and will research the leadership styles of contemporary leaders in different industries.
¼ credit, full-year, pass/fail.


THE CENTER FOR MULTICULTURAL AFFAIRS

Social Justice & the Media

What is an activist, an ally and an Up Stander?  And what effect does the media have on how we chose to act or not act?  This is a two-part elective with one semester designed to promote awareness and understanding of difference and its impact on the individual and society.  The second part of the class will focus on the role of the media on the themes and competencies learned in the first semester.  Students will deconstruct various types of media to show how the role of the media and how we engage with that information impacts every aspect of life and how we can choose to think critically about the information we are shown. 
1/8 credit, full-year, pass/fail.


ELECTIVES

News Media & Literary Magazine

Members of this class will serve as the staff of HB’s student magazine and online news. The magazine will comprise school news, opinion, fiction, poetry, art, and photography. The web site will represent a lively student forum of articles and multi-media pieces that report on all things relevant to the student body. In addition to writing their own pieces for the magazine, members of the class will solicit work from the student body, evaluate and provide feedback, select works for publication, and prepare the magazine for publication. While this class meets just once per cycle, students will devote substantial time outside of class to writing and production responsibilities.
¼ credit, full-year, pass/fail.


Introduction to Psychology

This course focuses on individual behavior and why an individual thinks, feels, and reacts to stimuli.  Major emphasis will be placed on methods, stages in childhood and adolescence, how the brain works, altered states of consciousness, psychological testing, and psychological disorders.
½ credit, full-year.  Open to juniors and seniors. 

Introduction to Broadcasting

Introduction to Broadcasting will provide students with in-depth instruction in video production and broadcasting techniques. The course will cover all aspects of production, from camera, audio, and lighting to digital video editing, special effects, and more. Other important production skills include: interviewing, scripting, advertising techniques, studio operations, and audience analysis. Basics of copyright law and broadcast ethics are also included in this course. Students will produce news shows and projects that apply technical knowledge and skills in media production. Most projects will be shared with a global audience via the Internet. All students involved in this course will be required to fulfill roles in front of the camera and behind the scenes. The course will be offered in the Worldwide Communication Center.
1/4 credit, full-year, pass/fail.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
Climate & Action

This course will engage students in updating and reporting out the school's Greenhouse Gas Inventory, planning and preparation to lead the Upper School Carbon Seminar.
1/4 credit, semester, pass/fail. 


 

Shaker Heights, Ohio Girls K-12 Coed Early Childhood

19600 North Park Boulevard Shaker Heights, Ohio 44122 P: 216.932.4214
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